Holbrook City Council considers second cemetery policy changes

first_img By Linda Kor Holbrook City Councilman Richard Peterson addressed an item on the council’s Oct. 24 agenda regarding the costs and regulations associated with the city cemetery. Peterson introduced the matter in a September meeting,Subscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad October 31, 2017 Holbrook City Council considers second cemetery, policy changeslast_img

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Suspects arrested for large amounts of heroin and fentanyl in vehicle

first_img Nichole I. Mitchell Alberto G. Sandoval         On April 9, Navajo County Sheriff’s Office deputies made a traffic stop on Interstate 40 near milepost 256. As a deputy was speaking to the driver and occupantSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad Suspects arrested for large amounts of heroin and fentanyl in vehicle April 18, 2019last_img

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Bobby Martin to become SnowflakeTaylor police chief

first_imgPhoto by Toni GibbonsSnowflake-Taylor Police Chief Larry Scarber (left) stands with Lieutenant Bobby Martin (right) who was named the new police chief upon Scarber’s retirement on June 30. Photo by Toni Gibbons Snowflake-Taylor Police Chief Larry Scarber (left) recognizes Officer Elijah Toth’s (right) recent promotion to sergeant at the joint meeting on May 2. By Toni Gibbons In a joint meeting of theSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad May 8, 2019center_img Bobby Martin to become Snowflake-Taylor police chieflast_img read more

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Weather Forecast Today Heavy rains make comeback in Mumbai Delhi wakes up

first_imgBy Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 8, 2019 4:48:22 pm Post Comment(s) The metropolis and its adjoining areas earlier received heavy rains for four consecutive days in June end-early July, badly affecting normal life and disrupting rail, road and air traffic at that time. After that, the city had been witnessing sporadic rains in the last few days. Mumbai weather forecastHot and humid day in DelhiMeanwhile, Delhi witnessed a hot and humid morning with the minimum temperature settling at 27 degrees Celsius, a notch above the season’s average. The weatherman has forecast cloudy sky with possibility of very light rain or drizzle on Monday. The maximum and minimum temperatures will be around 38 and 26 degrees Celsius, respectively.mumbai weather, mumbai rains, mumbai rains today, mumbai rains forecast, delhi weather, delhi monsoon, monsoon india, india weather Heavy downpour in Mumbai has been attributed to the cyclonic circulation persisting over south Gujarat and Maharashtra.Despite monsoon arriving in Delhi on Friday, rainfall has been sparse, with only light showers recorded in several parts of the city so far. Officials said Delhi was expected to receive only light or moderate rain during the week. Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield The temperature, too, is expected to climb starting Friday. Monsson usually arrives in Delhi on June 29. This year, however, the rain was delayed by a week.Heavy rains, thundershowers to last Uttar PradeshMonsoon made its presence felt in neighbouring Uttar Pradesh, which received rains on Sunday. The weatherman has forecast heavy to very heavy rain at isolated places in the state for Monday. Rain/ thundershowers are very likely at most places in the state on July 8, 9 and 10. the MeT department said.Rain accompanied by thundershower is most likely to occur at many places in Kerala and Lakshadweep also this week with the IMD issuing warning to fishermen in the area from venturing into the sea.‘Orange’ alert for Himachal PradeshThe meteorological department has also predicted extremely heavy rainfall in Himachal Pradesh Monday The Meteorological Centre, Shimla, has forecast rains in the plains as well as low and middle hills, and snowfall in the high hills from Monday till Friday.It has issued an ‘orange’ warning for extremely-heavy rains on Monday and ‘yellow’ warning for heavy rains on Tuesday.(Inputs from PTI) Top News mumbai rains, mumbai rains today, mumbai rains today live update, mumbai weather, mumbai rains live, mumbai rains forecast, mumbai rains forecast today, mumbai weather, mumbai weather today, mumbai weather forecast, mumbai weather forecast today, mumbai forecast A LifeGuard volunteer walks through Marine drive promenade during High tide. (Express photo by Nirmal Harindran)Heavy rains returned to Mumbai on Monday affecting road and rail traffic and briefly disrupting operations at the city airport. The India Meteorological Department (IMD) has also predicted heavy to very heavy rainfall in Konkan, Goa and north Madhya Maharashtra regions, including Mumbai, this week. The heavy downpour has been attributed to the cyclonic circulation persisting over south Gujarat and Maharashtra.Follow Mumbai Rains, Weather Today Live Updates Advertising Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Advertisinglast_img read more

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Rajasthan Cop beaten to death by group of men armed with sticks

first_img Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 13, 2019 10:54:40 pm Abdul Gani, who was posted at Bhim Police station, had gone to Hamela ki Ber village for investigating a case. “He was returning from the village on his motorcycle when some 4-5 unidentified persons attacked him with sticks,” Superintendent of Police Bhuvan Bhushan was quoted as saying by PTI.Although he was rushed to a hospital, he succumbed to his injuries, the officer added. While efforts to nab the accused are on, postmortem will be conducted on Sunday, the officer said.-with PTI inputs  After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Advertising Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Rajasthan: Police head constable beaten to death by unidentified group; no arrests yet Rajasthan: Abdul Gani was posted at Bhim Police station. (Source: ANI/Twitter)A police head constable was beaten to death by a group of unidentified assailants in Rajasthan’s Rajsamand district on Saturday, news agency PTI reported. Top News 8 Comment(s)last_img read more

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Govt readies plan for second wave of asset monetisation

first_imgWritten by P Vaidyanathan Iyer | New Delhi | Updated: July 15, 2019 10:10:57 am More Explained The inter-ministerial committee (IMC) chaired by NITI Aayog CEO Amitabh Kant and comprising the Finance Secretary and Secretary, Department of Investment and Public Asset Management (DIPAM), has already held three-four rounds of meetings with administrative ministries to push through the second lot of assets for recycling and monetisation.The IMC has discussed hiving off the pipeline and tower businesses of GAIL and BSNL, for second wave of asset monetisation respectively, and leasing them out to private players. It is also considering ways to utilise the large ATM network of state-owned banks.“This is the only way to raise money for big investments by government companies,” said an official, who did not wish to be named. Related News BSNL is offering broadband consumers 5GB daily data free of cost Advertising Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home “The money raised by leasing such a large tower network can be used to at least pay back the small and medium enterprises to which BSNL owes significant sums. The government need not provide funds from the Budget for this,” said an official.State-owned banks have vast ATM networks, although mergers between some have led to a marginal decline. In 2017-18, public sector banks had 1.45 lakh ATMs, 3,000 less than the previous year. Private sector banks, on the contrary, added about 1,500 ATMs last year, taking the total number to 60,145.“The IMC is still discussing with relevant departments on how best to utilise the large ATM network of public sector banks. Can they be pooled? Will it be possible to hive it off? How best can these assets be recycled and monetised?” said sources.The IMC is encouraged by two big asset sale decisions taken by the government over the last year or so. The National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) decided to auction nine projects last year. Australian capital fund manager Macquarie won these by offering an upfront payment of Rs 9,400 crore. Macquarie is required to collect toll, and operate and maintain these projects for 30 years, after which the assets will be handed back to NHAI. In the first round, the IMC had approved and submitted a list of 19 assets for monetisation to the government. These included 12 sports stadiums (three of Railways — one in Delhi and two in Visakhapatnam), five of Sports Authority of India (Delhi), two of ONGC (one each in Ahmedabad and Vadodara), one of BPCL in Mumbai, and one of RINL in Visakhapatnam.Also on the first list were NTPC’s Badarpur Thermal Power Plant in Delhi, ITDC’s Ashoka Hotel in Delhi, and four mountain railway properties in Darjeeling, Matheran, Nilgiris and Kalka-Shimla. It also included 18 central government holiday homes across India, which are currently under the Directorate of Estates.Also Read | Merger of three PSU general insurance companies to get ‘serious push’ this fiscalAccording to senior officials, in many cases of asset monetisation and recycling, the idea is to give the funds raised back to the company itself. “To beat the slowdown, we need the private sector to restart investment. If PSUs start spending, it will give confidence to the private sector to make fresh investments, which can set in motion a virtuous cycle of investment,” an official said. Recently, the Cabinet cleared Adani Enterprise’s bid for the lease of three airports — Ahmedabad, Lucknow and Mangaluru — operated by Airports Authority of India on a public-private partnership basis. Adani would carry out the operations, management and development of the airports for 50 years. In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief BSNL offers cashback up to 25%, free Amazon Prime on broadband plans Best Of Express Officials noted that asset recycle and monetisation should not be confused with disinvestment. In disinvestment, the government offloads or sells part of its ownership, whereas in asset monetisation, the ownership remains with the government — the underlying assets are leased on a long-term basis to private players.For instance, GAIL had a network of around 11,400 km of natural gas high-pressure trunk pipelines with a pan-India capacity to handle volumes of around 206 mmscmd (million metric standard cubic metres per day), as on March 31, 2018. However, average gas transmission during the last financial year was only 105 mmscmd, roughly 50 per cent of capacity.The pipelines can be handed over to private players on long-term lease, and the funds raised could be used by the PSU to expand its national pipeline network.While BSNL leases out some of its mobile towers, it has been at a slow pace. Given its country-wide network — 67,279 towers till September 2018 — it leased out only 1,415 to other telecom service providers and earned Rs 336 crore. Hiving this off to a separate business, like what many private telecom players had done, will attract investors.Read | Centre readies list of land assets for disinvestment Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Over 1,000 mobile towers of BSNL not functional over non-payment of energy bills: Ravi Shankar Prasad Advertising psu assets, govt psu assets revival, bsnl mtnl revival, govt bsnl mtnl revival plan, psu assets, govt psu assets, Amitabh Kant, govt asset monetisation On list: BSNL, GAIL, state bank assetsAN INTER-MINISTERIAL committee of the government will soon recommend a second list of PSU assets, including pipelines of GAIL, mobile towers of BSNL and MTNL, and ATMs of state-owned banks, that could be monetised to raise resources for fresh investment by these undertakings. Advertising 16 Comment(s)last_img read more

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EPA panel seeks to bring back fired scientists for cleanair review

first_img Originally published by E&E NewsA fractured EPA advisory panel is asking for help as its ability to handle a high-stakes review of particulate matter standards is under harsh scrutiny.At a public teleconference yesterday, the seven-member Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee agreed to recommend that EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler reconvene an auxiliary panel of experts he abruptly fired last October—or name a new panel made up of members with similar know-how. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Sean Reilly, E&E NewsMar. 29, 2019 , 4:50 PM U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler dismissed an auxiliary panel of air pollution experts last fall. Cliff Owen/AP Photo Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country There’s no assurance, however, the EPA chief will honor the request. A former contract lobbyist whose clients had included the nation’s largest privately owned coal company, Wheeler has given little explanation for his decision to disband the auxiliary panel, which was charged with helping the main committee in its review of the existing national limits on airborne particulate pollution (Greenwire, Oct. 12, 2018).In an email this afternoon, an EPA spokeswoman said Wheeler will take all of the committee’s advice under consideration. Tony Cox, a Denver-based consultant who chairs the committee, said in an email that members have not discussed how to proceed if Wheeler rejects it. Also unclear is whether revival of the auxiliary panel would act as a drag on completing the review by EPA’s self-imposed deadline of December 2020.The committee, usually known by its acronym of CASAC, is charged with offering independent advice to EPA during the review of the particulate standards, which were last revised in 2012. But its members’ fitness to do their jobs again came under biting attack yesterday from former CASAC members and other critics.”This process is a travesty,” Lianne Sheppard, an ex-member who is on the University of Washington’s public health faculty, said during one of two sessions allotted for public feedback during the teleconference. Sheppard was one of more than a dozen people to speak, many of whom were similarly cutting.For the committee, the call’s primary purpose was to hammer out a final version of its report on a draft EPA roundup of scientific research on particulate matter’s health and ecological effects. That draft roundup, released last fall and formally known as an integrated science assessment (ISA), cited evidence the existing standards are too weak.The CASAC’s preliminary report, made public early this month, had slammed the EPA document for employing “unverifiable opinions” to draw its conclusions and a litany of other alleged flaws. For the committee’s detractors, the scathing tone and tentative findings fueled suspicions the panel has no intention of conducting an impartial review.In a paper published last week, two of those critics accused Cox of pursuing an approach that would make it far more difficult for EPA to strengthen air quality standards to protect public health. Underlying calls for the revival of the auxiliary panel, which was made up mostly of scientists and researchers from academia, is the fact that the CASAC’s current members mostly lack a deep background in air pollution research.Cox, who has previously done work for the oil and chemical industries, had previously described the preliminary report as a CASAC document and accused opponents of distorting his views. Yesterday, however, he took responsibility for the language that has drawn the most attention and offered a partial mea culpa.While Cox did not disavow the views underlying his earlier broadside, he said he “made a bad mistake by holding out this ideal of what science should be and then criticizing the ISA for not adhering to that ideal.” A more useful approach, he said, would be to make specific recommendations for what the ISA should do “that it doesn’t do now.”The bulk of the call was dedicated to hashing out a final version of the preliminary report the committee could then send to Wheeler with its blessing. All of the committee’s seven members are rookies to EPA’s intricate process for reviewing air quality standards. During the call, there were occasional struggles to follow Cox as he proposed major changes to the preliminary report.”Where are we? What page are you on?” Steve Packham, a Utah state air official, asked at one point. The call, which had been scheduled to last four hours, ran closer to six. Citing a previous commitment, Corey Masuca, another member based in Alabama, dropped out early but left instructions with the EPA employee running the teleconference that he would go along with whatever the committee agreed on.Dominating the remaining discussions were Cox and Mark Frampton, a retired professor of medicine from the University of Rochester; the two politely but repeatedly clashed over specific “wordsmithing” changes to the preliminary assessment. One of the lengthier debates involved whether to recommend that the research underpinning the ISA’s conclusions should be “independently reproducible and verifiable.””This could be read as indicating that all studies should be thrown out unless somebody has gone in and reproduced them,” Frampton said. The wording, he indicated, reminded him of former EPA chief Scott Pruitt’s controversial proposal to more broadly bar the use of studies in drafting new regulations for which the underlying data were not transparent and reproducible.”The thing is, it should be independently reproducible—otherwise it’s not science,” Cox later replied, shortly before broaching a compromise that appeared to win Frampton’s assent. At the call’s conclusion, committee members verbally signed off on some significant changes to the original draft. Those changes will now be incorporated into a final version that will go to Wheeler; besides urging revival of the auxiliary panel, the committee is also calling on EPA to do a second draft of the ISA.Under the Clean Air Act, particulate matter is one of a half-dozen “criteria” pollutants for which EPA is supposed to periodically review and, if needed, tighten National Ambient Air Quality Standards.The use of auxiliary panels to augment the main CASAC’s expertise dates back decades. In defending Wheeler’s decision to fire the particulate matter review panel last fall, a spokesman said it was consistent with the Clean Air Act and the CASAC’s charter, neither of which mentions such panels.In response to a congressional query preceding his Senate confirmation earlier this year, Wheeler said he believed that the main committee “has the experience and expertise needed to serve in this capacity.” He added that EPA can also tap advice from other experts to assist the CASAC as needed.Reprinted from Greenwire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2019. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net. 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Day after quitting as Rajya Sabha MP Neeraj Shekhar joins BJP

first_img Mukul Roy claims 107 West Bengal MLAs from CPM, Congress, and TMC will join BJP Following his defeat in the 2014 parliamentary polls, the SP chose him for a Rajya Sabha berth. Shekhar’s term in the Upper House was to expire on November 2020.In the 2019 Lok Sabha elections, the SP got the Ballia seat as part of its seat-sharing arrangement with the BSP but decided to field former MLA Sanatan Pandey who eventually lost. Sources said Shekhar had been feeling sidelined after being overlooked for the Ballia ticket.Responding to the development, SP spokesperson Rajendra Chaudhary had said, “It is unfair on Shekhar’s behalf to take such a step. The SP sent him to Rajya Sabha even when he lost the Lok Sabha polls. He should have stuck to some political morals and values.”(With inputs from PTI) Delhi: Ex-BJP MLA acquitted for ‘stopping’ train in 2010 Advertising By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 16, 2019 6:02:49 pm The saffron party is likely to nominate him as its Rajya Sabha candidate from Uttar Pradesh, PTI reported.Rajya Sabha Chairman M Venkaiah Naidu said he had accepted the resignation of Shekhar after being satisfied that it was voluntary and genuine. “I made inquiries (with Shekhar) of the resignation being voluntary and genuine and having satisfied I have accepted the resignation with effect from July 15,” he said.A two-time Lok Sabha MP, Shekhar was first elected to the Lower House in a by-election in Ballia in 2007 after his father’s death. He retained the seat in the 2009 Lok Sabha elections. Neeraj Shekhar, sp, bjp, neeraj shekhar joins bjp, chandra shekhar son, resigns from Rajya sabha, rajya sabha mp, indian express Neeraj Shekhar joined BJP on Tuesday. (Express Photo: Prem Nath Pandey)A day after Neeraj Shekhar quit Samajwadi Party and resigned as Rajya Sabha MP, the son of former prime minister Chandra Shekhar Tuesday joined BJP in the presence of the party’s general secretaries Bhupendra Yadav and Anil Jain. Related News Advertising 11 Comment(s) West Bengal: Police intervene after BJP workers chanting Hanuman Chalisa block road in Howrah last_img read more

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FactChecking the PresidentElects Tweets

first_imgFact-checking President-elect Donald Trump can be a chore, even for people paid to do it. The Washington Post wants to make it less so, with add-ons to the popular Chrome and Firefox browsers.The browser extension, RealDonaldContext, is available from the Chrome Web Store or the Mozilla Foundation.After installation, any time you click on a tweet on the @realdonaldtrump account, any fact-checking the Post may have done also will be displayed.The fact-checking includes adding context. For instance, Trump posted this tweet on Dec. 12: Even though I am not mandated by law to do so, I will be leaving my busineses before January 20th so that I can focus full time on the……— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 13, 2016 If you view that tweet with the Post extension active, you’ll see this displayed:”There’s important context missing.”Trump originally pledged to hold a press conference on Dec. 15 to explain how he would avoid conflicts of interest as president. That was canceled before it happened. There remain questions about how Trump will ensure that his presidential decisions don’t unduly benefit his corporate interests, even if he’s not the titular head of the Trump Organization.”At the end of the Post’s comments is a link to a relevant story in the newspaper about the subject in the tweet.In addition to adding context to what can be misleading information in Trump’s tweets, the Post applet offers some kibbitzing.For example, on Dec. 11, Trump delivered this tweet: Just watched @NBCNightlyNews – So biased, inaccurate and bad, point after point. Just can’t get much worse, although @CNN is right up there!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 12, 2016 Limits of Extensions To which the Post software responded:”Just so you know.”Trump regularly watches — and complains about — television shows.” John Mello is a freelance technology writer and contributor to Chief Security Officer magazine. You can connect with him on Google+.center_img The software is designed to share accurate information “even in the place that’s most associated with Trump’s free-flowing streams of consciousness,” Philip Bump, the Post political reporter who authored the extension, told TechNewsWorld.Not all of Trump’s Twitter followers are likely to be interested in the applet, though, Bump acknowledged.”I think I understand that people who are big fans of Trump and believe him to be robustly honest won’t be inclined to download it,” he said.”The nice thing about these extensions is that they can work with any Web content,” Bump explained, “but there aren’t too many places where someone so important is making so many compact misstatements.”Two kinds of people will be interested in the add-on, noted Dan Kennedy, an associate professor at the school of journalism at Northeastern University.People who trust The Washington Post and believe that there are some facts in Trump’s tweets will be attracted to the app.”Those people will find it to be useful,” Kennedy told TechNewsWorld.Folks with a more jaded view of Trump also may be interested in the add-on.”Some people who already assume everything out of Trump’s mouth is a lie will find the app amusing and entertaining,” Kennedy observed.On the other hand, “if you’re a Trump fan, you’re going to see it as just one more sign of The Washington Post out to get Trump,” he said. While any effort to air facts is laudable, the potential of an add-on like the Post’s is limited, noted Matt Waite, a professor in the College of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.”I always caution people when they talk about making Chrome extensions that they’re a great idea and they work really well, but the number of people who actually use them is pretty small and the number of people who will find yours is even smaller,” he told TechNewsWorld.”I’m of the mind that any fact-checking that goes into our politics is a good thing,” Waite continued, “but let’s not get ahead of ourselves on how much of an influence this is going to have.”There’s a growing perception in the wake of the 2016 elections that we may be living in a post-fact world.”It’s the genius of the right,” NU’s Kennedy said, “that there are now a significant number of people who think The Washington Post and Breitbart are the same — one is just liberal and other is just conservative.” Preaching to the Choir?last_img read more

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An underused strategy for surge in STDs Treat patients partners without a

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 13 2018If patients return to Dr. Crystal Bowe soon after taking medication for a sexually transmitted infection, she usually knows the reason: Their partners have re-infected them.”While you tell people not to have sex until both folks are treated, they just don’t wait,” she said. “So they are passing the infection back and forth.”That’s when Bowe, who practices on both sides of the North and South Carolina border, does something doctors are often reluctant to do: She prescribes the partners antibiotics without meeting them.Federal health officials have recommended this practice, known as expedited partner therapy, for chlamydia and gonorrhea since 2006. It allows doctors to prescribe medication to their patients’ partners without examining them. The idea is to prevent the kind of reinfections described by Bowe — and stop the transmission of STDs to others.However, many physicians aren’t taking the federal government’s advice because of entrenched ethical and legal concerns.”Health care providers have a long tradition of being hesitant to prescribe to people they haven’t seen,” said Edward Hook, professor at the University of Alabama’s medical school in Birmingham. “There is a certain skepticism.”A nationwide surge of sexually transmitted diseases in recent years, however, has created a sense of urgency for doctors to embrace the practice. STD rates have hit an all-time high, according to the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention. In 2017, the rate of reported gonorrhea cases increased nearly 19 percent from a year earlier to 555,608. The rate of chlamydia cases rose almost 7 percent to 1.7 million.”STDs are everywhere,” said Dr. Cornelius Jamison, a lecturer at the University of Michigan Medical School. “We have to figure out how to … prevent the spread of these infections. And it’s necessary to be able to treat multiple people at once.”A majority of states allow expedited partner therapy. Two states — South Carolina and Kentucky — prohibit it, and six others plus Puerto Rico lack clear guidance for physicians.A 2014 study showed that patients were as much as 29 percent less likely to be re-infected when their physicians prescribed medication to their partners. The study also showed that partners who got those prescriptions were more likely to take the drugs than ones who were simply referred to a doctor.Yet only about half of providers reported ever having prescribed drugs to the partners of patients with chlamydia, and only 10 percent said they always did so, according to a different study. Chlamydia rates were higher in states with no law explicitly allowing partner prescriptions, research published earlier this year showed.Because of increasing antibiotic resistance to gonorrhea, the CDC no longer recommends oral antibiotics alone for the infection. But if patients’ partners can’t go in for the recommended treatment, which includes an injection, the CDC said that oral antibiotics by themselves are better than no treatment at all.”Increasing resistance plus increasing disease rates is a recipe for disaster,” said David Harvey, executive director of the National Coalition of STD Directors. The partner treatment is important for “combating the rising rates of gonorrhea in the U.S. before it’s too late.”The CDC recommendations are primarily for heterosexual partners because there is less data on the effectiveness of partner treatment in men who sleep with men, and because of concern about HIV risk.Bowe said that even though she writes STD prescriptions for her patients’ partners, she still worries about possible drug allergies or side effects.”I don’t know their medical conditions,” she said. “I may contribute to a problem down the road that I’m going to be held liable for.”In many cases, doctors and patients simply do not know about partner therapy. Ulysses Rico, who lives in Coachella, Calif., said he contracted gonorrhea several years ago and was treated by his doctor. He didn’t know at the time that he could have requested medicine for his girlfriend. She was reluctant to go to her doctor and instead got the required antibiotics through a friend who worked at a hospital.Related StoriesResearchers analyze link between videogame addiction and school inadaptationNew app created to help people reduce exposure to anticholinergic medicationsComputers, games, crafting keep the aging brain sharp”It would have been so much easier to handle the situation for both of us at the [same] moment,” Rico said.Several medical associations support partner treatment. But they acknowledge the ethical issues, saying it should be used only if the partners are unable or unwilling to come in for care.Federal officials are trying to raise awareness of the practice by training doctors and other medical professionals, said Laura Bachmann, chief medical officer of the CDC’s office of STD prevention. The agency posts a map with details about the practice in each state.Over the past several years, advocates have won battles state-by-state to get partner treatment approved, but implementation is challenging and varies widely, said Harvey, whose National Coalition of STD Directors is a member organization that works to eliminate sexually transmitted diseases.The fact that some states don’t allow it, or haven’t set clear guidelines for physicians, also creates confusion — and disparities across state lines.The Planned Parenthood affiliate that serves Indiana and Kentucky sees this firsthand, said clinical services director Emilie Theis. In Indiana, providers can legally write prescriptions for their patients’ partners, but they are prohibited from doing so in Kentucky, even though the clinics are only a short drive apart, she noted. A similar dynamic is at play along the South Carolina-North Carolina border, where Bowe practices.California started allowing partner treatment for chlamydia in 2001 and for gonorrhea in 2007. The state gives medication to certain safety-net clinics, a program it expanded three years ago. However, “it has been an incredibly difficult sell” because many medical providers think “it’s a little bit outside of the traditional practice of medicine,” said Heidi Bauer, chief of the STD control branch of California’s public health department.At APLA Health, which runs several health clinics in the Los Angeles area, nurse practitioner Karla Taborga occasionally gives antibiotics to patients for their partners. But she tries to get the partners into the clinic first, because she worries they might also be at risk for other sexually transmitted infections.”If we are just treating for chlamydia, we could be missing gonorrhea, syphilis or, God forbid, HIV,” Taborga said. But if prescribing the drugs without seeing the patients is the only way to treat them, she said, “it’s better than nothing.”Edith Torres, a Los Angeles resident, said she pressured her then-husband to go to the doctor after he gave her chlamydia several years ago: She refused to have sex with him until he did. Torres said she wanted him to hear directly from the doctor about the risks of STDs and how they are transmitted.If he had taken the medication without a doctor visit, he wouldn’t have learned those things, she said. “I was scared, and I didn’t want to get it again.”KHN’s coverage in California is supported in part by Blue Shield of California Foundation. last_img read more

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Scientists develop monoclonal antibodies combinations that protect animals from Ebola viruses

first_img Source:https://www.usamriid.army.mil/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 11 2019Scientists from academia, industry, and government have developed a combination of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that protected animals from all three Ebola viruses known to cause human disease. Their work is described in two companion studies published online in the journal Cell Host & Microbe.The mAb “cocktail,” called MBP134, is the first experimental treatment to protect monkeys against Ebola virus (formerly known as Ebola Zaire), as well as Sudan virus and Bundibugyo virus, and could lead to a broadly effective therapeutic, according to the authors.Over 20 Ebola virus outbreaks have occurred since the first outbreak was documented in 1976 in the Democratic Republic of Congo, or DRC (formerly called Zaire). The 2013-2016 Ebola epidemic in Western Africa–the largest outbreak to date–sickened more than 28,000 people and caused more than 11,000 deaths. An ongoing outbreak in the eastern Kivu region of DRC is already the second largest on record, according to the World Health Organization.No Ebola virus medical countermeasures have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. An experimental vaccine and several experimental therapeutics–including three based on mAbs–are being studied in the field. Despite their promise, all target only a single Ebola virus (Zaire) and are ineffective against the other two.”Developing a single treatment that could potentially be used for patients suffering from all the different types of Ebola viruses is an enormous advancement in the field,” commented John M. Dye, Ph.D. of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), one of the authors.Related StoriesSynthetic antibody rapidly prevents Zika infection in mice and non-human primatesNewly discovered antibody broadly inhibits multiple strains of pandemic norovirusAntibody-drug conjugate effectively targets surface protein in childhood neuroblastomasCiting growing evidence of the value of monoclonal antibodies for treating even the most virulent infections, Dye added, “This discovery has implications not only for the treatment of Sudan and Bundibugyo viruses, but for newly emerging Ebola viruses as well.”The two mAbs that make up MBP134 were previously discovered by the same research team in the blood of a human survivor of the 2013-2016 outbreak in Western Africa and were shown to target key sites of vulnerability shared by Ebola viruses.In the first study, a team led by Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein) engineered one of the mAbs to improve its activity against Sudan virus. They demonstrated that this enhanced mAb could work especially well with the second naturally occurring mAb to block infection by all three viruses and protect guinea pigs against both Ebola virus and Sudan virus. Additional modification of both mAbs to harness the power of “natural killer” immune cells enhanced MBP134’s broad protective efficacy in guinea pigs even further.In the second study, a team led by Dr. Zachary A. Bornholdt, Ph.D., of Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc. (MappBio) evaluated the MBP134 cocktail in large animal models that mimic Ebola virus disease in humans more closely. They found that a single low dose of MBP134 could protect monkeys against all three Ebola viruses associated with human disease, even when treatment was begun 4-7 days after the animals were infected.last_img read more

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Antibiotics and PPIs may increase risk of infectious diarrhea in children

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 8 2019Prior antibiotic exposure and use of acid suppressing medications known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase the risk for hospitalized children to contract dangerous Clostridioides difficile infections, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.”In pediatric patients, hospital-acquired infections due to C. difficile have increased over the last 20 years. However, few studies have looked at risk factors for these infections in children,” said Charles Foster, MD, a co-author and pediatric infectious diseases specialist at Cleveland Clinic Children’s. “We found that antibiotic exposure and use of proton-pump inhibitors may be risk factors. Clinicians should continue to utilize antibiotics judiciously in hospitalized children to minimize the risk of C. difficile infection.”The incidence and healthcare burden of C. difficile infection in hospitalized children has increased in the past two decades, mostly attributed to the emergence of a new, hypervirulent strain of the bacteria. While the risk factors are well understood in adult patients, current understanding of pediatric C. difficile is complicated. Many infants and toddlers under the age of 2 are colonized with the bacteria, but do not develop clinical illness.Related StoriesNew network for children and youth with special health care needs seeks to improve systems of careResearch reveals genetic cause of deadly digestive disease in childrenWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping ChildrenResearchers performed a meta-analysis and systematic review of 14 studies, including 10.5 million children, 22,320 of whom developed C. difficile infection. Based on this meta-analysis, previous antibiotic exposure and PPI use appear to be the most important risk factors associated with C. difficile infection in children. Children with prior antibiotic exposure may have approximately twice the risk of developing C. difficile infection, compared to patients without a recent history of antibiotic exposure, but the association was not statistically significant after pooling studies with only adjusted data. Researchers said that PPIs are suspected risk factors for CDI because they suppress gastric acid, which may disrupt the normal gastrointestinal microbial diversity in children.”Physicians should remain vigilant and continue judicious use of antibiotics and PPIs in hospitalized pediatric patients to minimize the risk of C. difficile infections,” said Abhishek Deshpande, MD, PhD, a co-author and assistant professor of medicine at Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. Dr. Deshpande has received research support from 3M, Clorox Company, and STERIS unrelated to this study.The researchers note the limitation of this research, including use of unadjusted data. Additional high-quality epidemiologic studies are needed to better evaluate the risk factors for C. difficile in children.Source: http://shea-online.org/last_img read more

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AntiTB drugs can increase susceptibility to Mtb reinfection

first_img Source:https://www.mcgill.ca/newsroom/channels/news/anti-tb-drugs-can-increase-risk-tb-re-infection-295658 Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 22 2019Current treatments for tuberculosis (TB) are very effective in controlling TB infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). They don’t, however, always prevent reinfection. Why this happens is one of the long-standing questions in TB research.So why are our bodies unable to generate permanent immunity to TB, – the leading infectious disease killer worldwide? A team of scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and McGill University may have found the answer… in the gut. In a study published recently in Mucosal Immunology, they showed that anti-TB drugs caused changes to gut microbiota – the diverse community of microbes living our intestines — and increased susceptibility to Mtb infection.Gut microbiota are critical to keeping us healthy; they help to digest food, combat pathogenic microbes and reinforce our immune system. Recent research has shown that chronic use of antibiotic leads to disruption of this community, which can in turn lead to dysregulation of the immune system. It remains unclear, however, whether changes in the composition of the microbes living in our gut have an influence on TB infection.Impact of anti-TB drugs on microbiome To find out, Drs. Irah King and Maziar Divangahi from the Meakins-Christie Laboratories at the RI-MUHC, with colleagues from McGill’s Macdonald Campus, treated mice with the most commonly used anti-TB drugs – isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide – for a period of eight weeks. They found that while all three drugs significantly altered the composition of the mice’s gut microbiome, only mice treated with isoniazid combined with pyrazinamide showed an increase in susceptibility to Mtb infection.To make sure the vulnerability of the host to Mtb infection was due to a compromised gut microbiota, the researchers looked at… feces. By transplanting feces from mice that had been treated with anti-TB drugs (specifically isoniazid and pyrazinamide) into untreated mice prior to infection, they were able to show for the first time that fecal transplant was sufficient to compromise immunity to Mtb.Related StoriesScientists discover how resistance to the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil arisesArtificial DNA can help release active ingredients from drugs in sequenceA Portable Solution for the On-scene Identification of KratomRelationship between the gut microbiome and the lungsKing and his colleagues also wanted to better understand the gut-lung axis – a bidirectional communication system between microorganisms residing in the gastrointestinal tract and the lungs – in order to how this might be involved in Mtb infection and immunity.To do so, they evaluated a number of lung cell types known to be important for resistance to Mtb infection. Following anti-TB treatment, alveolar macrophages, a type of immune cell located in the airways of mice and humans and the first cell to encounter Mtb upon infection, were compromised in their ability to kill Mtb.”We need to do more research in order to understand how the microbiome affects alveolar macrophages because these cells are critical for controlling early TB infection. We also need to identify the molecular pathways involved in the gut-lung axis,” explains King.”Anti-TB therapies have been incredibly efficient in controlling the TB epidemic by decreasing morbidity and mortality associated with Mtb,” says King. “Now, this work provides a basis for novel therapeutic strategies exploiting the gut-lung axis in Mtb infection.”Researchers are already thinking of monitoring patients who are being treated with these drugs to see how their gut microbiota changes over time and once treatment has stopped. The idea will be to control changes to the microbiome in combination with drugs that are effective at killing Mtb.last_img read more

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Flash fire in patients chest cavity during emergency heart surgery

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 3 2019At this year’s Euroanaesthesia Congress (the annual meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology) in Vienna, Austria (1-3 June), doctors present the unique case of a man who suffered a flash fire in his chest cavity during emergency heart surgery caused by supplemental oxygen leaking from a ruptured lung.Dr Ruth Shaylor and colleagues from Austin Health in Melbourne, Australia, where the incident took place, warn that the case highlights the potential dangers of dry surgical packs in the oxygen-enrich environment of the operating theatre where electrocautery devices (using heat to stop vessels from bleeding) are used.In August 2018, a 60-year-old man presented for emergency repair of an ascending aortic dissection–a tear in the inner layer of the aorta wall in the chest. The patient had a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting one year previously.Related StoriesGender biases are extremely common among health care professionalsImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsCommon cold virus strain could be a breakthrough in bladder cancer treatmentAs surgeons began to operate, they noted that the man’s right lung was stuck to the overlying sternum with areas of overinflated and destroyed lung (bullae; often caused by COPD). Despite careful dissection, one of these bullae was punctured causing a substantial air leak. To prevent respiratory distress, the flows of anesthetic gases were increased to 10 liters per minute and the proportion of oxygen to 100%.Soon after, a spark from the electrocautery device ignited a dry surgical pack. The fire was immediately extinguished without any injury to the patient. The rest of the operation proceeded uneventfully and the repair was a success. Source: ESA (European Society of Anaesthesiology) While there are only a few documented cases of chest cavity fires–three involving thoracic surgery and three involving coronary bypass grafting–all have involved the presence of dry surgical packs, electrocautery, increased inspired oxygen concentrations, and patients with COPD or pre-existing lung disease.This case highlights the continued need for fire training and prevention strategies and quick intervention to prevent injury whenever electrocautery is used in oxygen-enriched environments. In particular surgeons and anesthetists need to be aware that fires can occur in the chest cavity if a lung is damaged or there is an air leak for any reason, and that patients with COPD are at increased risk.”Dr Ruth Shaylorlast_img read more

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Researchers study molecular mechanism of interplay of clock proteins for circadian oscillation

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 7 2019Organisms on this planet, including human beings, exhibit a biological rhythm that repeats about every 24 h to adapt to the daily environmental alteration caused by the rotation of the earth. This circadian rhythm is regulated by a set of biomolecules working as a biological clock. In cyanobacteria (or blue-green algae), the circadian rhythm is controlled by the assembly and disassembly of three clock proteins, namely, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. KaiC forms a hexameric-ring structure and plays a central role in the clock oscillator, which works by consuming ATP, the energy currency molecule of the cell. However, it remains unknown how the clock proteins work autonomously for generating the circadian oscillation.Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairResearch on cannabis use in women limited, finds new studyTrump administration cracks down on fetal tissue researchThe research groups at Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Nagoya City University and Exploratory Research Center on Life and Living Systems (ExCELLS) and Institute for Molecular Science (IMS) of National Institutes of Natural Sciences investigated this mechanism by native mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. They found that KaiC degrades ATP into ADP within its ring structure, which triggers the leaping out of the tail of KaiC from the ring. KaiA captures the exposed KaiC tail, facilitating ADP release from the ring, thereby setting the clock ahead.This “fishing a line” mechanism explains the clockwork interplay of the KaiA and KaiC proteins. Elucidating this mechanism will provide deep insights into not only the circadian clock in cyanobacteria but also that in plants, animals, and humans under physiological and pathological conditions, including jet lag and sleep disorders.Source: National Institutes of Natural SciencesJournal reference: Yunoki, Y. et al. (2019) ATP hydrolysis by KaiC promotes its KaiA binding in the cyanobacterial circadian clock system. Life Science Alliance. doi.org/10.26508/lsa.201900368.last_img read more

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New study aims to improve physician wellbeing and patient outcomes

first_imgAt any national conference you attend now, burnout is the hot topic because it is worsening across the board. For a doctor, a health care system or medical school, the shared goal is to provide better patient care, but burnout negatively affects the quality of care provided. The purpose of our study is to bring back cheer and meaning in the clinical learning environment that can lead to better resident well-being and patient outcomes.”Prof. Dr. Prasanna Tadi, Creighton University’s School of Medicine Burnout reduces patient satisfaction, as well as physician productivity and effort, and it increases medical errors, turnover and medical costs. It is pervasive throughout the entire health care spectrum, Dr. Tadi said. A unique aspect of the Creighton study is its wide reach. In addition to residents and physicians, medical students, pharmacists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, dentists and nurses will participate in the study. Their well-being will be measured by the Mayo Clinic Resident/Fellow Well-Being Index score from July 2019 to June 2021. Study analysis will be provided semiannually to ACGME.”Our hope is that with this study we will be able to show improvement in multiple areas of well-being and relieve the pressures physicians are facing,” Dr. Tadi said. “We are trying to change the culture of patient care locally, but it has the potential to make a big impact across multiple disciplines nationally.”Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyStudy estimates health care costs of uncontrolled asthma in the U.S. over next 20 yearsAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaCreighton University’s C.H.E.E.R. study is intended to improve residents’ clinical learning environments by involving them in the process through a series of three interventions – C.H.E.E.R. Rounds, C.H.E.E.R. Meetings and C.H.E.E.R. Emails.Rounds – A central intervention in which each of Creighton’s hospital medicine services (HMS) teams will select one patient with a complex medico-social background for a half-hour of screen-free time at the patient’s bedside. The patient’s family is invited to bring personal photos of the patient to facilitate conversation and learn about the patient’s social background, hobbies and interests. The patient’s understanding of his/her health conditions and challenges in accessing health care will be discussed and all of the participating HMS teams will provide input. The goal of this first intervention is to cultivate a deeper resident-patient connection, enhance resident autonomy and interdisciplinary communication during these weekly sessions.Meeting – The second intervention lasts 60 minutes, occurs monthly, and each letter of the C.H.E.E.R. acronym represents a part of the meeting format:C – Celebrate – Patients celebrate their success and share their progress with residents.H – Hearing – Residents hear the patient’s journey through hospitalization and review areas for improvement.E – Expertise – Experts converse with residents regarding a specific wellness topic.E – Engage – Residents engage by sharing their own ideas on the wellness topic.R – Recharge – Residents discuss implementation of these ideas into their daily lives.Emails – The third intervention involves twice monthly CHEER emails being sent to house staff and faculty, including information about upcoming CHEER meetings and recognizing the personal and professional accomplishments of the residents.”Medical organizations throughout the country are prioritizing evidence-based research on this topic, and our study is designed to establish a long-term connection with the patients, who are the reason we entered into the medical profession in the first place,” Dr. Tadi said. Source:Creighton University Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jul 2 2019Patients see physicians to address issues with their well-being, but a new study by Creighton University’s School of Medicine will investigate if increasing time spent at bedside with patients increases the well-being of the health care professional, too. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) awarded Creighton University’s School of Medicine a grant for its C.H.E.E.R. Study: Bringing Cheer Back to the Bedside.Creighton is one of 30 organizations in the nation that had a project selected for ACGME’s Back to Bedside grant is a resident-led initiative that aims to empower the medical community to increase time with patients within a health care environment in which patient care and academic learning is more commonly occurring away from the patient’s bedside. Creighton’s C.H.E.E.R. project will be overseen by Dr. Prasanna Tadi, a Professor in Creighton University’s School of Medicine and neurologist with CHI Health who mentored the development of the study. Dr. Janani Baskaran is principal investigator of the project, which will facilitate some of the first research into how to address “physician burnout,” a priority issue in the national medical community.According to the National Academy of Medicine, burnout among physicians is nearly two times as high among United States physicians compared to any other field. More concerning, 400 physicians commit suicide every year, a rate that is more than double that of the general population.last_img read more

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Tesla makes 5000 Model 3s per week but can it continue

first_img CEO Musk: Tesla hits weekly goal of making 5,000 Models 3s Tesla Inc. made 5,031 lower-priced Model 3 electric cars during the last week of June, surpassing its often-missed goal of 5,000 per week. But the company still only managed to crank out an average of 2,198 per week for the quarter. Citation: Tesla makes 5,000 Model 3s per week, but can it continue? (2018, July 2) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-tesla-3s-week.html © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Shares of Tesla Inc. fell around 2 percent to $336.21 in late-day trading Monday.Consumer Edge Research Senior Analyst Jamie Albertine takes a more bullish view. He says Musk doesn’t manage for quarterly results, and believes Tesla can keep producing at the current rate. “I don’t believe their goal was to simply hit 5,000 a week and somehow revert to a lower production rate in the future,” Albertine said. “Their goal is to hit it sustainably with high quality production.”He thinks the company can reach production of 10,000 vehicles per week, or roughly a half-million per year. That will significantly lower capital spending and other expenses so it can turn a profit, said Albertine, who has met with Tesla management.Last summer, when the first Model 3s began rolling off the assembly line, Musk promised to build 5,000 per week by December and 10,000 per week in 2018. But he also warned at the time that Tesla was entering at least six months of “manufacturing hell.”On Monday, the company said it delivered 18,440 Model 3s during the quarter to help satisfy a waiting list that now is around 420,000. Some have been holding out for their cars since March of 2016 when the company first started taking orders. Another 11,166 Model 3s are en route to be delivered to owners, the company said.Currently the cheapest Model 3 that can be ordered costs around $49,000, and they can run upward of $70,000. The company hasn’t said when it will start producing the $35,000 version.Tesla also said it delivered 10,930 Model S sedans and 11,370 Model X SUVs during the quarter.Tesla burned through more than $1 billion in cash in the first quarter.Moody’s Investor Service downgraded Tesla’s debt into junk territory back in March, warning that Tesla won’t have cash to cover $3.7 billion for normal operations, capital expenses and debt that comes due early next year. Tesla said cash from Model 3 sales will pay the bills and drive profits.Musk told investors on a first-quarter earnings conference call that the company relied too heavily on automation. It had to hire more people to work at the factory. Tesla reported making 28,578 Model 3s from April through June, according to its quarterly production release on Monday.The Model 3, which starts at $35,000, is the key to turning Tesla from a niche maker of expensive electric cars to a profitable, mass-market automaker. The company badly needs cash from the compact cars to deliver on CEO Elon Musk’s promise to post a net profit and positive cash flow in the third and fourth quarters. The company has had only two profitable quarters in its 15-year history.To hit the 5,000-per-week mark, Tesla had to erect a second Model 3 assembly line under a tent outside its Fremont, California, factory, and Musk had to spend nights in the plant working out bugs with automation and other problems.The company now says it expects to hit 6,000 Model 3s per week by late August, with its Model 3 assembly line under the plant’s roof reaching 5,000 on its own.”The last 12 months were some of the most difficult in Tesla’s history,” the company’s statement said. Hitting the 5,000 mark “was not easy but it was definitely worth it,” the statement said.Tesla critics now wonder if it can keep up the 5,000-per-week rate, and they question whether it can build high-quality vehicles underneath the heavy-duty tent on the site of what once was a joint-venture factory for General Motors and Toyota.Dave Sullivan, manager of product analysis at AutoPacific Inc. and a former manufacturing manager for Ford Motor Co., said reaching the 5,000-per-week won’t make Tesla profitable by itself. He predicted the company will have trouble sustaining it because parts suppliers will have difficulty keeping up and bottlenecks will develop in the body assembly and paint shops.Tesla, he said, delayed delivery of many of the Model 3s that it made in the second-quarter to boost revenue and achieve the third-quarter profit that Musk promised. The company books revenue when vehicles are delivered.”They did everything they can to artificially pump up the third quarter,” Sullivan said. “I think the fourth quarter will be the quarter of reckoning.”CFRA Research analyst Efraim Levy lowered his rating on Tesla shares from “Hold” to “Sell,” saying he doesn’t see the production rate as “operationally or financially sustainable” in the short term. Over time he expects it to rise, though. Still, the stock is trading above his 12-month price target of $300, so he recommends selling it, he wrote Monday in a note to investors. Explore further In this May 27, 2018, file photo, a 2018 Model 3 sedan sits at a Tesla dealership in Littleton, Colo. Tesla Inc. made 5,031 lower-priced Model 3 electric cars during the last week of June, surpassing its often-missed goal of 5,000 per week. Tesla reported making 28,578 Model 3s from April through June, according to its quarterly production release on Monday, July 2. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Deion Jones signs 4year 57M extension with Falcons

first_imgThe Falcons have another key piece of their defense locked down.Atlanta extended linebacker Deion Jones on a four-year deal, the team announced Wednesday. NFL-NFLPA end ‘productive’ talks about new CBA early, report says The new contract is worth $57 million, with $34 million of that guaranteed, his agent told ESPN.Falcons are signing LB Deion Jones a four-year, $57 million extension, including $34 million guaranteed, @RosenhausSports tells ESPN. Jones is now tied to the Falcons through the 2023 season.- Adam Schefter (@AdamSchefter) July 17, 2019The Falcons’ announcement comes two days after the team agreed to terms with Grady Jarrett, who had the franchise tag placed on him. Jarrett agreed to a four-year deal worth a reported $68 million. Related News Jones, 24, was selected in the second round of the 2016 draft by Atlanta. He missed 10 games last season due to a foot injury, but was able to return for the latter part of the year.center_img Falcons, Grady Jarrett reach 4-year deal before franchise tag deadline In three seasons in the NFL, Jones has 297 tackles, 27 pass defenses, 15 tackles for a loss, eight interceptions and three touchdowns. He would have been a free agent in 2020.Atlanta is working on a contract extension with the team’s top wideout, Julio Jones, as well. It has been reported that both sides are trying to come to an agreement before training camp starts next week.last_img read more

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New York Is Overrun by Rats Yet We Know Almost Nothing About

first_img Chelsea Himsworth, Regional Director for the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative, University of British Columbia Rats! They eat our food, chew through our property and spread all sorts of nasty diseases. And they are gross (right?), with those naked tails and quick, unpredictable movements. Rats invade our homes — our castles! — the one place where we should be safe and in control. Over the millennia that we have lived with them, rats have proven themselves virtually impossible to expunge. They are so adaptable that they can exploit and infest virtually every corner of our cities. They avoid traps and poisons and reproduce at such a staggering rate that extermination attempts usually end up being a game of whack-a-mole… or, rather, whack-a-rat. Is it any wonder that many cities seem to be plagued by rats? Or do the cities themselves bear some responsibility for their rat problems? This is what I have been exploring over the past 10 years as a wildlife and public health researcher with the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative and the University of British Columbia.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65936-new-york-city-rats-and-humans.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Challenges of managing urban rodents For the most part, when it comes to dealing with rats, cities have it all wrong. For example, rat-related issues are addressed using a hodgepodge of unrelated policy and programming. At best, municipal leadership is highly fragmented; at worst, it’s absent altogether. Municipal governments may address rat infestations that occur on public properties or in buildings scheduled for demolition. Local health authorities may address infestations in food establishments or where there is a demonstrated health risk. For the most part, people are left to fend for themselves. Another problem is that we know very little about urban rats. There is simply not enough information about them to answer even the most basic questions like: How many rats are there? Where do they live? Why are they there? Is the problem getting worse? Despite this lack of knowledge, cities are often willing to invest tremendous amounts of time and resources into pest control interventions, such as New York City’s $32 million “war on rats.” It means that cities have no metric to determine the return on their investments, because without knowing what the rat problem looked like beforehand, there is no way of knowing whether an intervention made the problem any better. The cohabiting solution The key to solving this problem may lie in simply changing our perspective. Rather than viewing the city as a place entirely under human control that’s being invaded by rats, we need to recognize that the city is an ecosystem and that rats live here too. This does not mean that we should love rats, nor does it mean that we need to leave them alone. Rather, it shifts the focus to managing the ecosystem of which rats are a part, rather than focusing on the rats themselves. Once we recognize that we are managing a system, it becomes clear that leadership and strategic planning are critical. The very concept of a system is that the whole is more than the sum of its parts; this is the antithesis of the reductionist approach that we’re accustomed to that deals with infestations on a case-by-case basis. Instead, we need to understand the urban ecosystem, just like we would if we were trying to manage polar bear populations in the Arctic or elephant populations on the savanna. This means substantive, long-term investments in collecting data on rat populations and the specific conditions that support them, as well as the impact of any implemented interventions. It also means understanding the interface between rats and humans. For the majority of urban centres, rats pose a relatively minor threat to people. The threats are certainly not in proportion to the amount of negative attention rats receive. This means we need to understand why we find rats so disturbing, and what can be done to reduce that fear. Urban ecologies An ecosystem lens also directs us to look at areas of vulnerability and resilience within the system. When it comes to rats, our homes are the most obvious place of vulnerability, where the relationship between rats and people is least acceptable. However, private residences are often the areas most ignored by municipal powers. Also, rats and rat-related issues disproportionately affect impoverished, inner-city neighbourhoods, and residents of these neighbourhoods are particularly vulnerable to the physical and mental health impacts of living with rats. By identifying and focusing on these highly vulnerable scenarios, cities can start to make meaningful changes in how we perceive and deal with rats. This is not to say the rest of the urban landscape should be ignored. Rather, the identification of particular areas of vulnerability needs to take place within a larger framework that uses ecosystem-based principles to address rats specifically. Examples include changing the way that garbage cans are designed and enacting tougher bylaws that enshrine the right to live in a healthy and rat-free environment. These sorts of policies and programs that increase the resilience of the system have the potential to curtail the physical and psychological damage done by rats. The result is that co-existence with rats will come to seem no more unthinkable than our co-existence with, for instance, squirrels. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoLivestlyThe List Of Dog Breeds To Avoid At All CostsLivestlyUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndolast_img read more

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Notification issued for final phase of civic body polls in Jammu and

first_imgSHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTS COMMENT Published on local elections Army, police top brass review security situationcenter_img SHARE Jammu and Kashmir Jammu and Kashmir Chief Electoral Officer Shaleen Kabra issued notification on Monday for conduct of fourth and final phase of the upcoming municipal polls in the state. The notification has been issued for various wards of the municipal bodies across the state which are slated to go to the polls in the fourth phase on October 16, an official spokesperson said. According to the notification, the last date for filing nominations is October 1, while the scrutiny of nominations is October 3, he said.He said the last date for withdrawal of candidature is October 5 and counting of votes will be done on October 20. Reviwing securityDirector General of Police of Jammu and Kashmir Dilbagh Singh and the valley’s top army official Lt Gen A K Bhatt on Monday reviewed the security situation ahead of local bodies and panchayat elections at a meeting in Handwara of Kupwara district of the state.The meeting was also attended by GOC Kilo Force Maj Gen D P Pandey, IGP CRPF Zulfikar Hassan, IGP Kashmir Zone S P Pani, SP Handwara Ashish Mishra and Commandants of Army and CRPF.Addressing the officers, the DGP emphasised that the existing cooperation and synergy between different forces is to be further strengthened to combat the terrorism and also to ensure smooth conduct of the local governance elections. Singh expressed happiness that the synergy exhibited by the security forces at the ground level is the best model of success for any force.“Irrespective of the colour of uniforms, all forces are doing their best in service of the nation,” he said.The DGP said improvement in the situation has been made possible by the sacrifices and good work of all the forces. “The anti-infiltration operations on borders by the Army have proved very successful as a number of terrorists who were infiltrating into the State were killed,” he said hailing the role of the CRPF in assisting the police in maintaining law and order. September 24, 2018last_img read more

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