Maná Named 2018 Latin Recording Academy Person Of The Year

first_imgNews Maná Named 2018 Latin Recording Academy Person Of The Year Twitter Facebook “It is a grand and unexpected recognition to an extensive career, a beautiful and passionate one that we continue to enjoy as if it were the first day.” said Fher on behalf of the band. “We are flattered that the most prestigious Latin music organization is recognizing us. Undoubtedly, it will be moving to hear our songs performed by talented colleagues and friends. We hope to continue using our voices and this honor to raise awareness about environmental concerns and human rights issues around the world.”Maná has won awards at the 38th GRAMMY Awards, 41st GRAMMY Awards, 42nd GRAMMY Awards, 45th GRAMMY Awards, 49th GRAMMY Awards and 54th GRAMMY Awards.Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”Read morecenter_img Email Maná Is Latin Recording Academy Person Of The Year man%C3%A1-named-2018-latin-recording-academy-person-year The iconic GRAMMY and Latin GRAMMY-winning band will be honored for their artistic achievement and humanitarian contributions a day before the Latin GRAMMYs in Las Vegas Jennifer VelezGRAMMYs Sep 6, 2018 – 2:41 pm The Latin Recording Academy has announced Maná, the iconic Latin GRAMMY-winning pop-rock band, as the 2018 Latin Recording Academy Person Of The Year. The group is the first band to ever receive the honor. Maná, made up of Fher Olvera, Alex González, Sergio Vallín and Juan Calleros, is a six-time Latin GRAMMY and four-time GRAMMY winner. They will be recognized at a gala that will feature a tribute concert performed by their friends and other artists on Nov. 14 in Las Vegas, a day before the 2018 Latin GRAMMY Awards on Nov. 15.The band were essential in formulating Mexico’s ’90s rock scene and have become influential globally in Latin America and beyond for their fusion of pop, rock, bolero and other genres that continue to shape their sound. The band have also been advocates for social justice, global equality and environmental protection—they launched their philanthropic entity, Fundación Ecológica Selva Negra, which protects and preserves endangered species, has an educational component and helps develop community projects.”Maná (Fher, Alex, Sergio and Juan) is an iconic band with a profound social and environmental consciousness that has created captivating and vibrant music for over three decades,” said President/CEO of The Latin Recording Academy Gabriel Abaroa Jr.The Person Of The Year award honors musicians with an Ibero-American background for their musical achievements and humanitarian work.last_img read more

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Khaleda goes to HC challenging EC

first_imgBNP chairperson Khaleda Zia. Prothom Alo File PhotoBNP chairperson Khaleda Zia filed a writ petition with the High Court challenging the legality of the election commission’s decision that rejected all her three nominations for contesting the 30 December election, reports UNB.Lawyer Nowshad Jamin, on behalf of Khaleda Zia, filed the petition with the concerned High Court bench on Saturday morning.The bench of justice Syed Refaat Ahmed and justice Md Iqbal Kabir is likely to hear the petition on Tuesday, said lawyer Kaiser Kamal, a counsel of Khaleda Zia.Earlier on Saturday, the election commission upheld returning officers’ decisions cancelling the candidature of jailed BNP chairperson Khaleda Zia for forthcoming national election.On the basis of majority opinions of the five election commissioners, the commission pronounced its judgment turning down Khaleda’s petitions filed to it to get back her candidacy in Feni-1, Bogura-6 and 7 constituencies.The lawyers of BNP chairperson Khaleda Zia on Wednesday filed appeals with the election commission against rejection of her nomination papers of three constituencies.On behalf of Khaleda Zia, lawyer Kaisar Kamal submitted the appeal for Feni-1 constituency while lawyer Nowshad Jamin for Bogura-6 and lawyer Masud Ahmed Talukder for Bogura-7 constituencies at Nirbachan Bhaban in the city.Earlier, the EC on Sunday (2 Dec) ditched Khaleda’s all the three nomination papers filed for contesting the polls from Feni-1, Bogura-6 and Bogura-7 seats for her conviction in two graft case.On 29 October, Khaleda was convicted and sentenced to seven years’ rigorous imprisonment by a special court in Dhaka in Zia Charitable Trust corruption case.Khaleda landed in jail after being sentenced to five years’ imprisonment in Zia Orphanage Trust case by the same court on 8 February. The High Court later on 30 October extended her jail terms in the case to 10 years.last_img read more

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After Harvey Houston ISD Other Districts Could Get Break on Recapture Bills

first_img X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen 00:00 /01:10 APStephanie Garcia, left, waits with her family at a high school gym to be evacuated as the outer bands of Hurricane Harvey begin to make landfall, Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, in Corpus Christi, Texas. Harvey intensified into a hurricane Thursday and steered for the Texas coast with the potential for up to 3 feet of rain, 125 mph winds and 12-foot storm surges in what could be the fiercest hurricane to hit the United States in almost a dozen years.(AP Photo/Eric Gay)Before Harvey flooded much of the city, the Houston Independent School District owed almost $80 million in so-called Robin Hood money. It’s considered property wealthy and has to share money with property-poor school districts.It worried Superintendent Richard Carranza in the wake of the storm, when he roughly estimated the damage and manpower hours could cost HISD hundreds of millions of dollars.“This is important for us, that we look at the totality of what’s going to be flowing out, in terms of resources, for HISD and that we have that very structured conversation about how do we make the district whole, or at least somewhat whole,” Carranza said. Turns out wealthy districts like Houston can get a break on their bill after a natural disaster.Attorney David Thompson, who counsels school districts, said that they can apply some of the money owed to the state to disaster-related expenses that insurance or the Federal Emergency Management Agency won’t cover.“Frankly, it makes a lot of sense,” he said. “After a disaster, local property tax dollars that citizens are paying certainly should be used first to help recovery in their own community before simply being sent to Austin to be put in general revenue.”Thompson estimated Houston’s bill could be reduced by several million dollars. He added that the Texas Education Commissioner could also set up grant programs for districts that suffered damage from Harvey, but aren’t considered property wealthy. Sharelast_img read more

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Womens Leadership Luncheon

first_imgThree Washington-area residents who use their unique talents, resources and abilities to increase opportunities for women and girls will receive Visionary Awards at the Washington Area Women’s Foundation’s annual Leadership Luncheon Oct. 23 at the Grand Hyatt Washington. The luncheon’s theme is “Here. Now. For Her.” and builds on the national momentum for the economic advancement of women and girls. The Visionary Awards recipients are recognized for their commitment to advancing women and girls in the Washington region. For more information about the Washington Area Women’s Foundation, visit http://thewomensfoundation.org.last_img read more

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New Research From Psychological Science

first_imgWhen the Muses Strike: Creative Ideas of Physicists and Writers Routinely Occur During Mind WanderingShelly L. Gable, Elizabeth A. Hopper, and Jonathan W. Schooler Conceptually Rich, Perceptually Sparse: Object Representations in 6-Month-Old Infants’ Working MemoryMelissa M. Kibbe and Alan M. Leslie Read about the latest research published in Psychological Science: A Tight Spot: How Personality Moderates the Impact of Social Norms on Sojourner AdaptationNicolas Geeraert, Ren Li, Colleen Ward, Michele Gelfand, and Kali A. Demes How do contextual factors and personality traits affect how individuals adapt to a new culture when they temporarily move to a different country? To answer this question, Geeraert and colleagues analyzed data from a longitudinal acculturation project that measured young adults’ personality and cultural adaptation during and after a temporary move to a different country. These measures were collected on three occasions: 3 months before departure as well as 2 weeks and 5 months after arrival to the host country. Overall, participants who moved to a tight culture (i.e., one with strong norms and little tolerance for deviance) showed less adaptation than those who moved to a loose culture (i.e., one with less rigid norms), but participants originally from a tight culture showed more adaptation than those from a loose culture. Participants who scored higher on agreeableness and honesty-humility were less likely to feel the negative effects of cultural tightness or to return early to their home country. These results may help ensure a good fit between individuals’ personalities and their destination culture, which will increase the benefits of the rapid increase in international mobility. Do infants remember conceptual information about an object (e.g., the object is a ball) even when they do not remember perceptual information (e.g., the object is round and green)? This study indicates that they do. Six-month-old infants were familiarized with a yellow and red striped ball and a doll’s head with brown skin and eyes. The two objects were then hidden one at a time in separate locations. One of the objects then reappeared at the location where the first object was hidden; critically, this object could be the same one that had been hidden there or the other object. The experimenters measured the time that infants spent looking at this object. Infants looked longer when the object had been swapped, indicating that they remembered the hidden object’s conceptual information. This effect did not occur when the doll’s head was inverted and therefore not processed as a face. It also did not occur when the ball was swapped for a green ball with red polka dots or when the doll’s head was swapped for a doll’s head with pink skin and blue eyes, indicating that infants’ memory for the first object hidden relied on conceptual details (e.g., is the object a ball or a head?) but not on perceptual details (e.g., does the object have brown or blue eyes?). These results suggest that infants may encode the conceptual category of a hidden object, even when perceptual features are lost. Mind wandering, which involves thoughts that are both independent from the task at hand and different from one’s previous thoughts on the matter, can generate creative ideas experienced as “aha” moments, this study suggests. Every day for 1 or 2 weeks, physicists and writers listed their most important creative idea of the day, described what they were thinking and doing when the idea occurred, and rated the importance of the idea and whether it felt like an “aha” moment or not. Participants reported that about 20% of their most important ideas occurred when their minds were wandering, and these ideas were rated as being equally important and creative as the ideas formed while working on task. After 3 or 6 months, they rated all these previous ideas as slightly more creative but less important. Overall, ideas generated during mind wandering were more likely to be rated as “aha” moments, compared with ideas generated while working. Hence, profession-related ideas that occur outside of work when people are not thinking about the topic can be inventive and create sudden insights, showing a positive side of mind wandering.last_img read more

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