10 months agoLiverpool midfielder Wijnaldum: Klopp can be hard on you

first_imgLiverpool midfielder Wijnaldum: Klopp can be hard on youby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool midfielder Gini Wijnaldum insists manager Jurgen Klopp is no soft touch.The Dutchman says Klopp can be a hard taskmaster.He told the Liverpool Echo: “I can’t speak for every player but I have a good relationship with him. He has helped me a lot. He can be hard because he’s always on your case and saying what he thinks. But he’s honest and I like that. It’s always in the right way, always for the right reason. It’s not to make you feel bad or anything like that.”He’s really hard but on the other side he keeps your confidence high. He says that mistakes are just part of football. I remember against Leicester City I made a mistake and it led to a goal. He wasn’t angry about the mistake, he was more angry about my reaction afterwards. He thought I was too busy thinking it, rather than just putting it behind me.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Algoma to Up Stake in CSL Pool Acquire Oldendorffs Trio

first_imgzoomIllustration; Image Courtesy: Algoma Owner and operator of dry and liquid bulk carriers Algoma Central Corporation inked a definitive agreement to acquire the interest held by Oldendorff Carriers GMBH & Co. in the CSL International Pool, including the three vessels owned by Oldendorff operating in the pool. As a result of the transaction, Algoma’s interest in the pool will increase to approximately 40%. The company currently owns five vessels operating in the pool.The pool consists of 18 self-unloading vessels ranging from handy-sized to panamax and provides specialized shipping services to customers along the coasts of the Americas and in the Caribbean.As a result of this transaction, Algoma will acquire the handy-sized m/v Alice Oldendorff, and the m/v Harmen Oldendorff and the m/v Sophie Oldendorff, both of which are panamax vessels, for USD 100 million. The deal is expected to close late in the second quarter of 2019.“Increasing our participation in the pool has been a strategic interest for Algoma for some time and the completion of this transaction is aligned with that intent,” said Ken Bloch Soerensen, President and Chief Executive Officer of Algoma.“During 2018, we assumed technical management of our existing pool ships and opened a new office in Fort Lauderdale with an expanded technical staff. We expect to assume technical management of these three ships seamlessly on closing.”Algoma expects to fund the transaction principally from the proceeds of the refund guarantees from the cancellation of four Croatian shipbuilding contracts.“Redeploying the proceeds of the refund guarantees in this manner enables us to put those funds to work quickly in a business we know well with attractive returns,” said Peter Winkley, Chief Financial Officer of Algoma.“Although a decision is pending on the replacement of the vessels that were to have been built by Uljanik shipyard, we expect to fund any instalments required on such replacement contracts from operating cash flows and available credit facilities.”The company cancelled four ships at Uljanik last year as the struggling Criatian  shipyard was making very slow progress on the construction. The first contract for the construction of one Equinox self-unloader was rescinded in September 2018. Three more cancellations of Equinox vessel contracts followed suit in October 2018.According to Soerensen, the cancellations eliminated CAD 145 million (USD 110 million) of commitments and CAD 112 million of installment refunds was expected.last_img read more

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Digital terrestrial television is booming in Latin

first_imgDigital terrestrial television is booming in Latin America and will be in 94.5% of homes by 2020, according to a new report.This means 132 million DTT homes will be added in the region in the decade between 2010 and 2020, according to the Digital TV Latin America report, and that DTT will account for half of all digital TV homes added by 2020.In comparison, just 18.1% of homeswere DTT-enabled four years ago.“Much of this growth is being driven by satellite TV, especially lower-cost and prepaid packages – although these subscribers are forcing down average ARPU figures,” said Simon Murray, principal analyst at Digital TV Research, the report’s creator.Nearly 14.4 million satellite pay TV households will be added between 2013 and 2020, with 3.1 million added this year alone. Pay satellite TV penetration will be 21.1% by end-2014 – up from 9.6% in 2010 – and up to 25.8% in 2020, which indicates much of the fastest growth has already taken place.Free-to air DTT will overtake pay satellite in 2015, Digital TV Research predicts. This will see the number of primary DTT homes rocket from 4.3 million at end-2010 (3% penetration) to 27.1 million (18%) in 2014 and on to 71.1 million (42%) by 2010.Brazil, Mexico and Argentina are predicted to dominate the region. Brazil alone will add 37 million digital TV households between 2013 and 2020, with Mexico contributing 15 million and Argentina nearly seven million more.Digital TV households will also increase rapidly in the other 16 countries covered in this report – collectively adding 34 million digital homes between 2013 and 2020.The report studied trends in 19 territories across the region, and each will see rapid increases in digital FTA uptake, with a collective 34 million homes added between 2013 and 2020. Pay TV penetration will also rise, but not as significantly – up 12% in 2010 from year-end-2013.Pay TV revenues will be US$4.5 billion higher in 2020 than in 2013, taking an overall US$24.7 billion. Satellite will remain the largest contributor at US$17.6 billion, while cable will add US$6.1 billion.last_img read more

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AntiTB drugs can increase susceptibility to Mtb reinfection

first_img Source:https://www.mcgill.ca/newsroom/channels/news/anti-tb-drugs-can-increase-risk-tb-re-infection-295658 Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 22 2019Current treatments for tuberculosis (TB) are very effective in controlling TB infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). They don’t, however, always prevent reinfection. Why this happens is one of the long-standing questions in TB research.So why are our bodies unable to generate permanent immunity to TB, – the leading infectious disease killer worldwide? A team of scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and McGill University may have found the answer… in the gut. In a study published recently in Mucosal Immunology, they showed that anti-TB drugs caused changes to gut microbiota – the diverse community of microbes living our intestines — and increased susceptibility to Mtb infection.Gut microbiota are critical to keeping us healthy; they help to digest food, combat pathogenic microbes and reinforce our immune system. Recent research has shown that chronic use of antibiotic leads to disruption of this community, which can in turn lead to dysregulation of the immune system. It remains unclear, however, whether changes in the composition of the microbes living in our gut have an influence on TB infection.Impact of anti-TB drugs on microbiome To find out, Drs. Irah King and Maziar Divangahi from the Meakins-Christie Laboratories at the RI-MUHC, with colleagues from McGill’s Macdonald Campus, treated mice with the most commonly used anti-TB drugs – isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide – for a period of eight weeks. They found that while all three drugs significantly altered the composition of the mice’s gut microbiome, only mice treated with isoniazid combined with pyrazinamide showed an increase in susceptibility to Mtb infection.To make sure the vulnerability of the host to Mtb infection was due to a compromised gut microbiota, the researchers looked at… feces. By transplanting feces from mice that had been treated with anti-TB drugs (specifically isoniazid and pyrazinamide) into untreated mice prior to infection, they were able to show for the first time that fecal transplant was sufficient to compromise immunity to Mtb.Related StoriesScientists discover how resistance to the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil arisesArtificial DNA can help release active ingredients from drugs in sequenceA Portable Solution for the On-scene Identification of KratomRelationship between the gut microbiome and the lungsKing and his colleagues also wanted to better understand the gut-lung axis – a bidirectional communication system between microorganisms residing in the gastrointestinal tract and the lungs – in order to how this might be involved in Mtb infection and immunity.To do so, they evaluated a number of lung cell types known to be important for resistance to Mtb infection. Following anti-TB treatment, alveolar macrophages, a type of immune cell located in the airways of mice and humans and the first cell to encounter Mtb upon infection, were compromised in their ability to kill Mtb.”We need to do more research in order to understand how the microbiome affects alveolar macrophages because these cells are critical for controlling early TB infection. We also need to identify the molecular pathways involved in the gut-lung axis,” explains King.”Anti-TB therapies have been incredibly efficient in controlling the TB epidemic by decreasing morbidity and mortality associated with Mtb,” says King. “Now, this work provides a basis for novel therapeutic strategies exploiting the gut-lung axis in Mtb infection.”Researchers are already thinking of monitoring patients who are being treated with these drugs to see how their gut microbiota changes over time and once treatment has stopped. The idea will be to control changes to the microbiome in combination with drugs that are effective at killing Mtb.last_img read more

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Researchers study molecular mechanism of interplay of clock proteins for circadian oscillation

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 7 2019Organisms on this planet, including human beings, exhibit a biological rhythm that repeats about every 24 h to adapt to the daily environmental alteration caused by the rotation of the earth. This circadian rhythm is regulated by a set of biomolecules working as a biological clock. In cyanobacteria (or blue-green algae), the circadian rhythm is controlled by the assembly and disassembly of three clock proteins, namely, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. KaiC forms a hexameric-ring structure and plays a central role in the clock oscillator, which works by consuming ATP, the energy currency molecule of the cell. However, it remains unknown how the clock proteins work autonomously for generating the circadian oscillation.Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairResearch on cannabis use in women limited, finds new studyTrump administration cracks down on fetal tissue researchThe research groups at Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Nagoya City University and Exploratory Research Center on Life and Living Systems (ExCELLS) and Institute for Molecular Science (IMS) of National Institutes of Natural Sciences investigated this mechanism by native mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. They found that KaiC degrades ATP into ADP within its ring structure, which triggers the leaping out of the tail of KaiC from the ring. KaiA captures the exposed KaiC tail, facilitating ADP release from the ring, thereby setting the clock ahead.This “fishing a line” mechanism explains the clockwork interplay of the KaiA and KaiC proteins. Elucidating this mechanism will provide deep insights into not only the circadian clock in cyanobacteria but also that in plants, animals, and humans under physiological and pathological conditions, including jet lag and sleep disorders.Source: National Institutes of Natural SciencesJournal reference: Yunoki, Y. et al. (2019) ATP hydrolysis by KaiC promotes its KaiA binding in the cyanobacterial circadian clock system. Life Science Alliance. doi.org/10.26508/lsa.201900368.last_img read more

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Tesla makes 5000 Model 3s per week but can it continue

first_img CEO Musk: Tesla hits weekly goal of making 5,000 Models 3s Tesla Inc. made 5,031 lower-priced Model 3 electric cars during the last week of June, surpassing its often-missed goal of 5,000 per week. But the company still only managed to crank out an average of 2,198 per week for the quarter. Citation: Tesla makes 5,000 Model 3s per week, but can it continue? (2018, July 2) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-tesla-3s-week.html © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Shares of Tesla Inc. fell around 2 percent to $336.21 in late-day trading Monday.Consumer Edge Research Senior Analyst Jamie Albertine takes a more bullish view. He says Musk doesn’t manage for quarterly results, and believes Tesla can keep producing at the current rate. “I don’t believe their goal was to simply hit 5,000 a week and somehow revert to a lower production rate in the future,” Albertine said. “Their goal is to hit it sustainably with high quality production.”He thinks the company can reach production of 10,000 vehicles per week, or roughly a half-million per year. That will significantly lower capital spending and other expenses so it can turn a profit, said Albertine, who has met with Tesla management.Last summer, when the first Model 3s began rolling off the assembly line, Musk promised to build 5,000 per week by December and 10,000 per week in 2018. But he also warned at the time that Tesla was entering at least six months of “manufacturing hell.”On Monday, the company said it delivered 18,440 Model 3s during the quarter to help satisfy a waiting list that now is around 420,000. Some have been holding out for their cars since March of 2016 when the company first started taking orders. Another 11,166 Model 3s are en route to be delivered to owners, the company said.Currently the cheapest Model 3 that can be ordered costs around $49,000, and they can run upward of $70,000. The company hasn’t said when it will start producing the $35,000 version.Tesla also said it delivered 10,930 Model S sedans and 11,370 Model X SUVs during the quarter.Tesla burned through more than $1 billion in cash in the first quarter.Moody’s Investor Service downgraded Tesla’s debt into junk territory back in March, warning that Tesla won’t have cash to cover $3.7 billion for normal operations, capital expenses and debt that comes due early next year. Tesla said cash from Model 3 sales will pay the bills and drive profits.Musk told investors on a first-quarter earnings conference call that the company relied too heavily on automation. It had to hire more people to work at the factory. Tesla reported making 28,578 Model 3s from April through June, according to its quarterly production release on Monday.The Model 3, which starts at $35,000, is the key to turning Tesla from a niche maker of expensive electric cars to a profitable, mass-market automaker. The company badly needs cash from the compact cars to deliver on CEO Elon Musk’s promise to post a net profit and positive cash flow in the third and fourth quarters. The company has had only two profitable quarters in its 15-year history.To hit the 5,000-per-week mark, Tesla had to erect a second Model 3 assembly line under a tent outside its Fremont, California, factory, and Musk had to spend nights in the plant working out bugs with automation and other problems.The company now says it expects to hit 6,000 Model 3s per week by late August, with its Model 3 assembly line under the plant’s roof reaching 5,000 on its own.”The last 12 months were some of the most difficult in Tesla’s history,” the company’s statement said. Hitting the 5,000 mark “was not easy but it was definitely worth it,” the statement said.Tesla critics now wonder if it can keep up the 5,000-per-week rate, and they question whether it can build high-quality vehicles underneath the heavy-duty tent on the site of what once was a joint-venture factory for General Motors and Toyota.Dave Sullivan, manager of product analysis at AutoPacific Inc. and a former manufacturing manager for Ford Motor Co., said reaching the 5,000-per-week won’t make Tesla profitable by itself. He predicted the company will have trouble sustaining it because parts suppliers will have difficulty keeping up and bottlenecks will develop in the body assembly and paint shops.Tesla, he said, delayed delivery of many of the Model 3s that it made in the second-quarter to boost revenue and achieve the third-quarter profit that Musk promised. The company books revenue when vehicles are delivered.”They did everything they can to artificially pump up the third quarter,” Sullivan said. “I think the fourth quarter will be the quarter of reckoning.”CFRA Research analyst Efraim Levy lowered his rating on Tesla shares from “Hold” to “Sell,” saying he doesn’t see the production rate as “operationally or financially sustainable” in the short term. Over time he expects it to rise, though. Still, the stock is trading above his 12-month price target of $300, so he recommends selling it, he wrote Monday in a note to investors. Explore further In this May 27, 2018, file photo, a 2018 Model 3 sedan sits at a Tesla dealership in Littleton, Colo. Tesla Inc. made 5,031 lower-priced Model 3 electric cars during the last week of June, surpassing its often-missed goal of 5,000 per week. Tesla reported making 28,578 Model 3s from April through June, according to its quarterly production release on Monday, July 2. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Deion Jones signs 4year 57M extension with Falcons

first_imgThe Falcons have another key piece of their defense locked down.Atlanta extended linebacker Deion Jones on a four-year deal, the team announced Wednesday. NFL-NFLPA end ‘productive’ talks about new CBA early, report says The new contract is worth $57 million, with $34 million of that guaranteed, his agent told ESPN.Falcons are signing LB Deion Jones a four-year, $57 million extension, including $34 million guaranteed, @RosenhausSports tells ESPN. Jones is now tied to the Falcons through the 2023 season.- Adam Schefter (@AdamSchefter) July 17, 2019The Falcons’ announcement comes two days after the team agreed to terms with Grady Jarrett, who had the franchise tag placed on him. Jarrett agreed to a four-year deal worth a reported $68 million. Related News Jones, 24, was selected in the second round of the 2016 draft by Atlanta. He missed 10 games last season due to a foot injury, but was able to return for the latter part of the year.center_img Falcons, Grady Jarrett reach 4-year deal before franchise tag deadline In three seasons in the NFL, Jones has 297 tackles, 27 pass defenses, 15 tackles for a loss, eight interceptions and three touchdowns. He would have been a free agent in 2020.Atlanta is working on a contract extension with the team’s top wideout, Julio Jones, as well. It has been reported that both sides are trying to come to an agreement before training camp starts next week.last_img read more

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New York Is Overrun by Rats Yet We Know Almost Nothing About

first_img Chelsea Himsworth, Regional Director for the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative, University of British Columbia Rats! They eat our food, chew through our property and spread all sorts of nasty diseases. And they are gross (right?), with those naked tails and quick, unpredictable movements. Rats invade our homes — our castles! — the one place where we should be safe and in control. Over the millennia that we have lived with them, rats have proven themselves virtually impossible to expunge. They are so adaptable that they can exploit and infest virtually every corner of our cities. They avoid traps and poisons and reproduce at such a staggering rate that extermination attempts usually end up being a game of whack-a-mole… or, rather, whack-a-rat. Is it any wonder that many cities seem to be plagued by rats? Or do the cities themselves bear some responsibility for their rat problems? This is what I have been exploring over the past 10 years as a wildlife and public health researcher with the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative and the University of British Columbia.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65936-new-york-city-rats-and-humans.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Challenges of managing urban rodents For the most part, when it comes to dealing with rats, cities have it all wrong. For example, rat-related issues are addressed using a hodgepodge of unrelated policy and programming. At best, municipal leadership is highly fragmented; at worst, it’s absent altogether. Municipal governments may address rat infestations that occur on public properties or in buildings scheduled for demolition. Local health authorities may address infestations in food establishments or where there is a demonstrated health risk. For the most part, people are left to fend for themselves. Another problem is that we know very little about urban rats. There is simply not enough information about them to answer even the most basic questions like: How many rats are there? Where do they live? Why are they there? Is the problem getting worse? Despite this lack of knowledge, cities are often willing to invest tremendous amounts of time and resources into pest control interventions, such as New York City’s $32 million “war on rats.” It means that cities have no metric to determine the return on their investments, because without knowing what the rat problem looked like beforehand, there is no way of knowing whether an intervention made the problem any better. The cohabiting solution The key to solving this problem may lie in simply changing our perspective. Rather than viewing the city as a place entirely under human control that’s being invaded by rats, we need to recognize that the city is an ecosystem and that rats live here too. This does not mean that we should love rats, nor does it mean that we need to leave them alone. Rather, it shifts the focus to managing the ecosystem of which rats are a part, rather than focusing on the rats themselves. Once we recognize that we are managing a system, it becomes clear that leadership and strategic planning are critical. The very concept of a system is that the whole is more than the sum of its parts; this is the antithesis of the reductionist approach that we’re accustomed to that deals with infestations on a case-by-case basis. Instead, we need to understand the urban ecosystem, just like we would if we were trying to manage polar bear populations in the Arctic or elephant populations on the savanna. This means substantive, long-term investments in collecting data on rat populations and the specific conditions that support them, as well as the impact of any implemented interventions. It also means understanding the interface between rats and humans. For the majority of urban centres, rats pose a relatively minor threat to people. The threats are certainly not in proportion to the amount of negative attention rats receive. This means we need to understand why we find rats so disturbing, and what can be done to reduce that fear. Urban ecologies An ecosystem lens also directs us to look at areas of vulnerability and resilience within the system. When it comes to rats, our homes are the most obvious place of vulnerability, where the relationship between rats and people is least acceptable. However, private residences are often the areas most ignored by municipal powers. Also, rats and rat-related issues disproportionately affect impoverished, inner-city neighbourhoods, and residents of these neighbourhoods are particularly vulnerable to the physical and mental health impacts of living with rats. By identifying and focusing on these highly vulnerable scenarios, cities can start to make meaningful changes in how we perceive and deal with rats. This is not to say the rest of the urban landscape should be ignored. Rather, the identification of particular areas of vulnerability needs to take place within a larger framework that uses ecosystem-based principles to address rats specifically. Examples include changing the way that garbage cans are designed and enacting tougher bylaws that enshrine the right to live in a healthy and rat-free environment. These sorts of policies and programs that increase the resilience of the system have the potential to curtail the physical and psychological damage done by rats. The result is that co-existence with rats will come to seem no more unthinkable than our co-existence with, for instance, squirrels. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoLivestlyThe List Of Dog Breeds To Avoid At All CostsLivestlyUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndolast_img read more

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Skill centre for apparel industrySkill centre for apparel industry

first_imgSHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTS Published on SHARE December 27, 2018 COMMENTcenter_img knitwear and hosiery Tamil Nadu apparel industry A Centre of Excellence for Apparel, Made-Ups and Home Furnishing Sector Skill Council (AMHSSC) was inaugurated at Tirupur on Thursday. The AMHSSC was formulated by the Ministry of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship and National Skill Development Council to develop a skills repository for the apparel value chain, national occupational standards in the industry. The mandate given to the Council includes creation of national occupational standards, affiliating training providers in apparel trainings and assessing and certifying the trainees of such institutes and trainers. last_img read more

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