Dicks Sporting Goods Offering Wilmington Little League Families A 20 Discount On

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Dick’s Sporting Goods is offering Wilmington Little League families 20% off throughout the store on Saturday, March 23, 2019 and Sunday, March 24, 2019.  This coupon is valid at the store’s Davners, Saugus, and Salem, NH locations.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip?Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedDick’s Sporting Goods Offering Wilmington Little League Families A 20% Off Coupon For March 24 & 25In “Sports”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Saturday, March 23, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Sunday, March 24, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

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SAIL Floor Price Set at ₹83 Government Lines Up ONGC CIL and

first_imgThe Narendra Modi government is set to kick off its disinvestment programme on Friday, 5 December, with a 5% stake sale at a floor price of ₹83 in the state-run Steel Authority of India.The auction method, used for this round of disinvestment, will see the government raise around ₹1,700 crore. The stock closed on Thursday at ₹85.25. The steelmaker’s stock has risen just over half to 18%, of the 36% growth experienced by the broader market.The Centre has set for itself a target to raise ₹43,425 crore ($9.5bn) through disinvestment for the current fiscal, a figure that might just turn out to be a bit too high. Resistance from staff unions and investor worries about certain company-specific issues has slowed down the pace.However, the government needs the disinvestment measures to succeed, if it has to meet its budget deficit target of 4.1%.So far, the government has been able to raise about $8.1million, a miniscule part of the projected figure, through stock sale of two state-run institutions limited to the respective employees.SAIL, 80% owned by the state, plans to offload 206.5 million shares through an auction on the stock exchanges on Friday, according to a filing on Wednesday.The Centre is keen to gauge the response of investors through the SAIL auction, after which it plans to sell another 5% stake in ONGC, 10% in Coal India Ltd, 11.36% in NHPC Ltd, as well as list firms including RINL and Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd.Retail investors get a 5% discount on the floor price, with 10% of the offered stock reserved for them. HSBC Securities, Deutsche Equities and JP Morgan India are among the six merchant bankers advising the SAIL stake sale.Modi’s plans for 100 smart cities and a possible cut in interest rates in 2015 could help steel firms build up a significant order book, in the face of increased infrastructure building activity.last_img read more

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Houstons James Beard SemiFinalists And A Hummer Hits Some Trail Riders The

first_img X Listen A lot can happen in a week. Some of it good. Some of it bad. Some of it downright ugly. When faced with intriguing developments in the week’s news, we turn to a rotating panel of “non-experts” to parse The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly of it all.This week, our panel weighs in on these stories:Eleven Houston-area chefs and restaurants being selected as semi-finalists for 2019 James Beard awardsA Hummer driver sideswiping a horse during the trail ride to the Houston Livestock Show and RodeoOur panel of non-experts this week includes:Marco Roberts, president of the Log Cabin Republicans of HoustonMary Flood, blogger and consultant for Androvett Legal Media and MarketingEvan Mintz, deputy opinion editor for the Houston Chronicle 00:00 /11:28 Share To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

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DC Leaders Take Sides on ExelonPepco Merger

first_imgFormer D.C. Mayor Anthony Williams favors the Exelon-Pepco merger.As the date of the District’s public service commission decision on the Exelon-Pepco merger draws near, District political and business leaders are publicly expressing their feelings about it.A spokeswoman for the D.C. Public Service Commission told the AFRO on May 22 that a decision on the Exelon-Pepco merger will take place on or before Aug. 25. Judi Jones, an advisory neighborhood commissioner for single-member district 4B07, has been outspoken in her opposition to the merger.“There is an overwhelming lack of support for this,” Jones said. “I don’t like the fact that a monopolistic nuclear power company will be in charge of power to District residents and businesses. Thirty out of 40 advisory neighborhood commissions have voted not to support this merger because it is not in the best interest of the residents.”Exelon of Chicago plans to acquire Pepco Holdings for $6.83 billion. If it goes through, Exelon would control the lucrative mid-Atlantic power market and would also give the company financial resources to aid its ailing nuclear power plant portfolio.The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Virginia, New Jersey, and Maryland, approved the merger on May 15. Maryland supports the merger but has 46 conditions that largely deal with energy efficiency, relief for low-income customers, and the delivery of services.The District and Delaware are considering the merger and for Exelon to acquire Pepco, those two jurisdictions must approve.Residents had until May 27 at 5:30 p.m. to submit comments on the merger to the public service commission. Anthony Lorenzo Green, the chairman of the 8B advisory neighborhood commission, led his colleagues to vote against the merger on May 19.“Our residents have a lot of concerns about this deal,” Green said. “There isn’t a lot of faith in Pepco as it is. Many of our residents don’t think that a nuclear-power company in Chicago will be responsive to their needs.”The advisory neighborhood commissions as well as the D.C. Council have no voice in the merger’s approval. However, D.C. Council members Mary Cheh (D-Ward 3), Charles Allen (D-Ward 6) and Elissa Silverman (I-At Large) opposed the merger earlier this year and were recently joined by David Grosso (I-At Large) and Brianne Nadeau (D-Ward 6) on that.“I have concluded that the merger does not meet the “public interest” standard as required by the law of the District of Columbia,” Grosso said in a May 12 letter to the public service commission. “First, Exelon has a storied history of opposing commitments to renewable energy. Second, Pepco divested from its generation assets (which focus on financial growth) several years ago and is now focused primarily on the distribution of electricity to its customers.”Grosso said, in essence, that he didn’t want District residents to pay for Exelon’s floundering nuclear power plants. Nadeau, in a May 22 letter to the public service commission, expressed discomfort with the financial benefit that Pepco shareholders and company executives would get as a result of the merger while there are no solid guarantees of rate fairness for consumers.D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson (D) hasn’t commented on the merger because he owns Pepco stock and D.C. Council member Vincent Orange (D-Ward 5) is a former Pepco vice president and has therefore recused himself from the debate.Jones said that there is one public official she wishes would take a position on the merger: D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser (D). “She needs to take a stand on this,” Jones said.The mayor, through a statement and in interviews with the AFRO, has said she is reviewing the merger and wants what is best for the residents of the District.The merger has its supporters in the District. “A proposal that brings substantial and tangible benefits for D.C. citizens and economy, with no downside, should be pursued,” former D.C. Mayor Anthony Williams and Harry Wingo, president of the D.C. Chamber of Commerce, said in a May 15 edition of the Washington Business Journal touting the merger.Williams, the executive director of the Federal City Council, and Wingo argue that the $125 one time rate credit, Exelon’s $1.6 million a year community benefits program and its promise to improve performance for customers merit approval of the merger.“When you look at the facts, this proposal is good for residents and ratepayers and it is good for our economy,” the two business leaders said. “We believe that when the [public service commission] examines the facts of this proposal it will agree-and approve this merger.”last_img read more

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Synthetic and living micropropellers support convectionenhanced nanoparticle transport

first_img © 2019 Science X Network ABF locally perturbs fluid flow. (A) Schematic of a 200-μm-wide microfluidic channel with suspended ABF (36 μm long, 10 μm in diameter) positioned at the channel center (x,y,z) = (0,0,0). The upper channel contains water, whereas the lower channel contains 200-nm fluorescent NPs. (B) Snapshot of ABF in a 200-μm-wide channel perturbing the tracked paths of the 200-nm fluorescent NPs indicating fluid flow. Scale bar (top), 10 μm. A numerical simulation of two-fluid flow with an ABF at the interface, with color indicating concentration distribution (red, 1 mol/m3; blue, 0 mol/m3) of molecular species (bottom). (C) Velocity profile at positions upstream and downstream of the ABF. For the control, at x = +3 mm, an unperturbed laminar profile with peak velocity of 50 μm/s was simulated. At both x = +50 μm (upstream) and x = −50 μm (downstream), an increase in peak velocities is predicted, with the peak shifted closer toward the channel wall for the upstream case. (D) Simulation results for the y velocity component uy (orthogonal to and out of the channel) at the same positions as (C). In the vicinity of the ABF, a push directed orthogonal to the flow direction toward the channel wall is predicted. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aav4803 Explore further Tiny robots powered by magnetic fields could help drug-delivery nanoparticles reach their targets Generally, NP transport is affected by surface charge, hydrophobicity and surface biochemistry; properties that can be actively optimized in research work for more effective in vivo trafficking. Scientists have used external energy sources such as magnetic and acoustic forces to create wirelessly controlled microbots and shuttle the therapies to diseased tissue for improved diffusive transport. However, these methods still relied on diffusive transport after releasing their onboard cargo, while the need remains for more distinct strategies of transport into a defined location. Control of green fluorescently labeled MTB in microfluidic device, when RMF is on/off. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aav4803 Conceptual overview of magnetically controlled micropropellers for convection-enhanced NP transport. (A) Conceptual schematic depicting a single microrobot, the artificial bacterial flagellum (ABF), enhancing mass transport of nanoparticles (NPs) at the vessel-tissue interface (left), and swarms of magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) generating convective flow to improve mass transport (right). ECM, extracellular matrix. (B) Schematic of magnetofluidic platform for NP mass transport studies using magnetically induced convection. The microfluidic chip is placed between the objective lens of an inverted optical microscope and the electromagnets (left). A schematic depicts the chip, consisting of an upper channel filled with NPs (red) and a lower water channel (blue) that both border a collagen matrix (gray) along restricting trapezoidal posts made of PDMS. NPs can passively diffuse into the collagen matrix along their concentration gradient toward the water channel. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aav4803 Ferrohydrodynamic pumping with controlled swarms of MTB. (A) Transmission electron micrograph of M. magnetic strain AMB-1. Scale bar, 0.5 μm. The magnetosomes are clearly visible, here formed in two distinct strings of iron oxide crystals. (B) Control of AMB-1 under static magnetic fields (top) and magnetic fields rotating in-plane at 1 Hz. Scale bar (bottom), 5 μm. (C) Postprocessed images of tracked, co-suspended, nonmagnetic, fluorescent NPs used to observe flow fields generated by a swarm of MTB exposed to a 12-mT magnetic field rotating at 10 Hz in the y-z plane. Traces in green correspond to traveled trajectories over 12 frames (~1 s). Positions are computed using band-pass filter with 25-pixel diameter, followed by peak finding (top). Bacterial motion can be steered by changing the direction of the vector of the rotating magnetic field, because the MTB translate within the plane of rotation (bottom). For an RMF vector around the x axis, bacteria rotate along y, generating a flow that transports NPs along y. (D) Translational velocity is plotted versus applied rotational frequency at two different magnetic field strengths. Translational velocity increases with frequency initially, but at sufficiently high frequencies, it decreases because fluidic drag torque overcomes the magnetic torque to prevent them from keeping up with the rotation of the field. The maximum synchronized frequency, also corresponding to the maximum translational velocity, is referred to as the step-out frequency ωmax. When the magnetic field strength is increased, the step-out frequency increases, as observed. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aav4803 , Advanced Materials The scientists also developed a single-fluid flow model in a microchannel to form a bioinspired microvessel with biomimetic scales and fluid flow rates. The model contained concentrated collagen in the center that mimicked the native extracellular matrix. Using the device, Schuerle et al. quantified the fluorescent intensity in the biomimetic matrix to test if the magnetically controlled ABF could enhance the mass transport of fluorescently labelled NPs into the tissue-mimicking matrix. The results indicated that ABFs were limited as a convective micropropller in smaller vessels, but this can be changed by scaling the ABF structure to suit the channel size in the future.The scientists considered the effects of a whole swarm of smaller microrobot propellers next. For this, Schuerle et al. selected the wild type MTB strain AMB-1 (Magnetospirillum magneticum) to form magnetosomes. The microorganisms naturally produced chains of iron oxide particles in lipid bilayers of the plasma membrane for manipulated movement using external magnetic fields. While researchers had used MTBs in previous studies as potential vehicles of drug delivery with external magnetic fields, Schuerle et al. used rotational magnetic fields (RMFs) in the present work. The RMFs forced the movement of an MTB swarm to drive their motion via magnetic torque. , Nature Nanotechnology The scientists lowered the average distance between the bacteria by using a high concentration of MTBs to press the cell neighbors forward in 3-D swarms dominated by hydrodynamic forces. They did not observe clustering or aggregation of the MTB magnetosomes when exposed to RMFs since the magnetosomes were inherently shielded by the bacterial cell membranes for controlled fluid flow. Schuerle et al. repeated the experiments for biomimicry using a microfluidic device containing collagen to show that MTB swarms could penetrate collagen, when sufficiently high concentrations of MTBs were used. In this way, using two experimental strategies Schuerle et al. improved the mass transport of NPs, via convective flow generated by magnetically controlled micropropellers. The microrobotic experiments showed that ABF mimicked a bacterial flagellum to assist NP accumulation and penetration into a dense collagen matrix – when acted upon by RMFs. Schuerle et al. propose to include such stationary ABFs into stents to trigger drug release and improve penetration at a site of interest to counteract inflammation on demand. With the second strategy, they focused on generating the same technique but with magnetotactic bacterial strains (MTBs). Based on the present work and the existing tumor-homing properties of MTBs, the scientists envision magnetically controlled swarms of 3-D MTBs to transport NPs in the interstitial fluid space of tumor microenvironments. The scientists will optimize the density of bacteria for a compatible dose in vivo and the work will pave the way forward to further studies on micro- and nanomaterials for magnetically enhanced NP transport in clinical nanomedicine.center_img They used rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) to power the devices and create local fluid convection to overcome the diffusion-limited transport of nanoparticles. During the first experimental approach, they used a single synthetic magnetic microrobot as an artificial bacterial flagellum (ABF) and then used swarms of a naturally occurring magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) to create a “living ferrofluid” by exploiting the ferrohydrodynamics. Using both approaches the scientists enhanced the transport of NPs in a microfluidic model of blood extravasation (movement of a drug from blood vessels to the external tissue) and tissue penetration in microchannels surrounded by a collagen matrix to create a biomimetic tissue-vessel interface in the lab. The results of the study are now published in Science Advances. Nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly popular in nanomedicine due to biomedical research potential as carriers in drug delivery that surpass the limits of conventional medicine. While NPs are designed to alter the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of existing drugs, they are impeded by physiological barriers, which prevent successful accumulation at the sites of disease, limiting their therapeutic effects in vivo. During cancer therapy, for instance, drug carriers encounter abnormal vessels that surround the tumor architecture for ineffective intravenous drug release. Since delivering NPs into tissues is strongly influenced by their physiochemical properties, scientists have re-designed the NP shapes and sizes to optimize their transport kinetics through vessel walls to reach tissues. Researchers had previously proposed multistage approaches for optimized drug delivery, either by shrinking nanoparticles in time, or fragmenting them to disperse and reach a site of interest only after encountering microenvironmental cues of disease in vivo. , Science Schuerle et al. engineered the magnetic ABF using three-dimensional (3-D) lithography and metal deposition, as previously reported. The bioinspired microrobots mimicked the rotating flagella for efficient propulsion-based locomotion at the microscale—where viscous drag forces dominate. They controlled the ABF motion with uniform magnetic fields in 3-D rotation using a wireless magnetic control setup containing electromagnets arranged around a single hemisphere. Then they mounted the setup on an inverted microscope to track the movements of the controlled microrobots. The rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) allowed forward propulsion and convective flow in the surrounding fluid and when the scientists immersed the ABF in a suspension of fluorescent NPs, they observed controlled flow for mass transport of the NPs.In the experiment, they constructed the bottom layer of the microfluidic channel to contain the 200 nm NPs similar to the size used in clinical applications, while on the top fluid layer they maintained a suspension of pure aqueous medium. The scientists stationed the ABF at the center of the setup to sustain its position against the flow by controlling the fluid flow in the setup. This arrangement of the ABF in a microfluidic channel disrupted the laminar flow to produce convection, which transported NPs from the fluid layer at the bottom to the upper layer—to reach the channel wall, i.e., the location of interest. The artificial bacterial flagellum (ABF) in a microvessel-like one-fluid flow device. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aav4803 Nanoparticles (NPs) are a promising platform for drug delivery to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease and inflammation. Yet the efficiency of NP transfer to the diseased tissue of interest is limited due to an assortment of physiological barriers. One significant hurdle is the transport of NPs to precisely reach the target tissue of interest. In a recent study, S. Schuerle and a team of interdisciplinary researchers at the departments of Translational Medicine, Biophysics, Engineering Robotics, Nanomedicine and Electronics, in Switzerland, the U.K. and the U.S. developed two distinct microrobot-based micro-propellers to address the challenge. More information: S. Schuerle et al. Synthetic and living micropropellers for convection-enhanced nanoparticle transport, Science Advances (2019). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aav4803 R. Blakemore. Magnetotactic bacteria, Science (2006). DOI: 10.1126/science.170679 Ouajdi Felfoul et al. Magneto-aerotactic bacteria deliver drug-containing nanoliposomes to tumour hypoxic regions, Nature Nanotechnology (2016). DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2016.137 Soichiro Tottori et al. Magnetic Helical Micromachines: Fabrication, Controlled Swimming, and Cargo Transport, Advanced Materials (2012). DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103818 In the present work, Schuerle et al. detailed two distinct strategies to generate wirelessly localized convective flow to prevent the invasiveness of implanted nanoparticles. Inspired by the field of microrobots (microbots), the scientists used (1) a single, synthetic, bacteria-inspired microrobot, or (2) large swarms of living bacteria to drive localized NP transport. The artificial and natural micropropellers assisted the process by promoting magnetically driven convection into a defined location in a magnetofluidic setup with potential for therapeutic applications. The synthetic microbot imitated bacterial propulsion using an artificial bacterial flagellum (ABF), while the dense swarms of magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) harnessed by Schuerle et al. occurred naturally as gram-negative prokaryotes (Magnetospirillum magneticum) with magnetic properties. The scientists expect the results to overcome existing transport barriers for enhanced NP tissue penetration via wireless control and spatiotemporally precise local convection in the future. Journal information: Science Advances Citation: Synthetic and living micropropellers support convection-enhanced nanoparticle transport (2019, May 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-synthetic-micropropellers-convection-enhanced-nanoparticle.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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