Why Dolby Atmos is the Future of Cinema Sound

first_imgIf you’ve not experienced Dolby Atmos just yet, you might be wondering what’s so great about it. These industry experts will set you straight.Dolby Atmos is the future of cinema sound. While the industry might be going crazy over the number of K’s images can be shot on and projected with, cinema sound hasn’t advanced that much (so it would seem) in the past several decades. Until now. Dolby Atmos first hit just a few theatres in the summer of 2012 with Pixar’s Brave being the first feature film to make use of the new system, but is now available in a growing number of cinemas worldwide.In this latest Dolby promo you can learn a lot more about why director of photography turned director, Wally Pfister thinks Atmos is the IMAX of audio, and how he put it to good use in Transcendence.Understanding Dolby AtmosIf you want to get a decent understanding of what Dolby Atmos actually is – and how it works, then these two videos will give you the full picture. The second features a fairly decent history of the evolution of cinema sound and a detailed description of the inside workings of surround sound.Dolby Atmos in the CinemaDolby’s sound consultants chat with film critic Peter Cowie about how Dolby Atmos can shape as well as enhance the filmmaker’s sound design possibilities. When Alfonso Cuaron and Gravity‘s Oscar winning sound designer want to come to hear their film in your cinema, you know you’re doing something right. So it is for the owners of Olympic Cinema in London, talking about just how spectacular Dolby Atmos really is.If you want to find a Dolby Atmos equipped cinema near you then simply hop over to iwantdolbyatmos.dolby.com.More Posts on Cinema Sound DesignIf all this talk of cinema sound design has whet your appetite to learn more then check out these previous posts on the topic.Fellow PremiumBeat blogger, Matt Hibbard has put together this excellent post called Sound Design 101: Making your Film Sound Great. Danny Greer has also posted this great tutorial on mapping out your sound design for indie filmmakers. This last PremiumBeat post discusses how to work well with a film composer to successfully score your film. Finally you can also check out the category of posts devoted to sound design over on my blog.last_img read more

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Federer makes quick work of Monaco at US Open

first_imgRoger Federer reached the quarterfinals at a 30th consecutive Grand Slam tournament by making quick work of the 36th-ranked Juan Monaco 6-1, 6-2, 6-0 at the U.S. Open.Federer’s fourth-round match against Monaco didn’t get started until nearly midnight, and thanks to his superb play, it was over shortly before 1:15 a.m. Tuesday.Federer played brilliantly right from the start, taking the first five games – and 20 of the first 25 points – in only 12 minutes. He didn’t miss a beat in the second set, hitting four aces in his opening service game and finishing with 14.Five of Federer’s record 16 major championships have come at Flushing Meadows. In the quarterfinals, Federer will face 11th-seeded Jo-Wilfried Tsonga of France, who eliminated No. 8 Mardy Fish of the United States in five sets Monday.Tsonga upset Federer in the Wimbledon quarterfinals two months ago, coming all the way back after dropping the first two sets.”He’s a tough player. … I look forward to that match,” Federer said. “If I play as good as I did today, sure I have a chance.”Federer compiled a 42-4 edge in winners against Monaco.The start of their match was delayed because the preceding match in Arthur Ashe Stadium – No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki’s 6-7 (6), 7-5, 6-1 victory over No. 15 Svetlana Kuznetsova – lasted 3 hours, 2 minutes.”You have to be ready,” Federer said.Wozniacki, seeking her first Grand Slam title, trailed by a set and 4-1 in the second before coming back to beat the 2004 U.S. Open champion.advertisement”I knew that I had to do something,” said Wozniacki, who faces No. 10 Andrea Petkovic of Germany next. “I had to do something different.”She managed to turn things around thanks to a combination of her own increasingly aggressive play and Kuznetsova’s increased mistakes. Kuznetsova’s 40-20 edge in winners was rendered meaningless by her 78 unforced errors, 52 more than Wozniacki, who reached the U.S. Open quarterfinals for the third year in a row.Tsonga made it this far in New York for the first time, and unlike Fish, he’s already tasted this sort of success. Tsonga made it to the final of the 2008 Australian Open before losing to Novak Djokovic, and got to the Wimbledon semifinals this year – where he again lost to Djokovic.On Monday, Djokovic extended his 2011 record to 61-2 by beating No. 22 Alexandr Dolgopolov of Ukraine 7-6 (14), 6-4, 6-2. Their 16-14 tiebreaker in the first set lasted nearly a half-hour all on its own, with Djokovic saving four set points and finally converting his sixth when Dolgopolov pushed a forehand long to close a 13-stroke exchange.Both men called that tiebreaker the key to the match. One tiny piece of evidence: Dolgopolov double-faulted twice in the opening game of the second set to get broken, and Djokovic was on his way.Asked whether he considered winning that energy- and will-testing tiebreaker to be a physical or mental triumph, Djokovic replied: “Combination of both. But in the end, it was more mental, just to hang in there, try to play right shots at the right time.”Djokovic now meets his Serbian Davis Cup teammate and friend Janko Tipsarevic, who is seeded 20th and made it to the first Grand Slam quarterfinal of his career by beating 2003 French champion and U.S. Open runner-up Juan Carlos Ferrero of Spain 7-5, 5-7, 7-5, 6-2 in a match that lasted more than 3 hours.”Strange feeling,” Djokovic said. “We are professionals. Certainly we both want to win the match when we play against each other. So you kind of forget about friendship. You put that aside.”Most players complained about the wind, which gusted at up to 20 mph (32 kph) and kept changing directions, making even serve tosses difficult.Serena Williams handled those conditions much better than former No. 1 and 2008 French Open champion Ana Ivanovic and beat her 6-3, 6-4 to return to a Grand Slam quarterfinal for the first time in 14 months. She missed about 11 of those with a series of health scares but looks really good so far at the U.S. Open.Against Ivanovic, Williams hit nine aces overall, only lost serve once, and finished off the match with four consecutive unreturned serves that ranged from 99 to 111 mph.”I didn’t even go for winners at any point,” said Williams, who hit only 16. “I just tried to get it over because it was so windy. It was definitely tough.”She’s seeded only 28th because of all of that time away, but now has won her past 16 matches heading into a quarterfinal against No. 17 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Russia. Pavlyuchenkova got past 2010 French Open champion Francesca Schiavone 5-7, 6-3, 6-4 in a match with 21 double-faults and 16 service breaks in 31 games.advertisement”I’m going to say that I don’t want to go out there and enjoy just being on center court playing against Serena,” Pavlyuchenkova said. “I would like to do well, try to fight, and with my effort, I’ll try to beat her.”last_img read more

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North of border, Warriors enter new territory: 1-0 deficit in NBA Finals

first_imgPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hosting “There was plenty on there that we need to do better if we want to win another game in this series,” Nurse said.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew LATEST STORIES Samantha Corpuz, Zedrick Borja ace IronKids race anew View comments Kevin Durant out with Achilles injury; to undergo MRI on Tuesday PLAY LIST 03:12Kevin Durant out with Achilles injury; to undergo MRI on Tuesday01:43Who are Filipinos rooting for in the NBA Finals?02:25Raptors or Warriors? PBA players take their pick of NBA champ02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Head coach Steve Kerr of the Golden State Warriors reacts against the Toronto Raptors in the second half during Game One of the 2019 NBA Finals at Scotiabank Arena on May 30, 2019 in Toronto, Canada. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Gregory Shamus/Getty Images/AFPTORONTO — Steve Kerr has seen a little of almost everything during his wildly successful five-year run as coach of the Golden State Warriors.This, however, is something new.ADVERTISEMENT Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. For the first time, Kerr and the Warriors are staring at a 1-0 deficit in the NBA Finals. They’ve trailed in series before, faced plenty of adverse moments along the way, but this is the newest challenge for a franchise trying to join the short list of clubs that have won three consecutive championships.“The experience helps,” Kerr said Friday, a day after the Toronto Raptors struck first. “Winning multiple championships helps because you have seen it all. There’s also just the knowledge that you’ve been here before. You’ve been down. We have been up 3-1 and lost a series. We have been down 3-1 and won a series. Everything in between. So nothing is going to catch these guys off-guard.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsThat’s his hope, anyway.There was a clear air of confidence from the Warriors even in the very first moments after the loss Thursday night. They knew they didn’t play particularly well, and lost by only nine. They trailed most of the way, yet still were within striking distance plenty of times. They seemed far from rattled. Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport “No matter what, our sights were coming in that it’s a long series,” Warriors star Stephen Curry said. “And Game 2 is an opportunity for us to right the wrongs and get a big win and go back home.”Toronto Raptors fans celebrate their teams 118-109 win over the Golden State Warriors during Game One of the 2019 NBA Finals at Scotiabank Arena on May 30, 2019 in Toronto, Canada. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images/AFPNo one needs to explain to the Warriors that a win on Sunday completely shifts the narrative.And even though the axiom has always been that Game 1 winners usually go on to win the series — and that is still the case — it seems that a 1-0 deficit isn’t as daunting to teams as it once might have been.Since the league went to the 16-team format for the 1984 postseason, Game 1 winners have never been as vulnerable as they have seemed to be this year. In the 14 series this year that preceded the NBA Finals, six Game 1 winners wound up losing their series. That’s never happened before in this format.In the 2010s, Game 1 winners have gone on to lose a series 31% of the time. In the 2000s, it was 25%; in the 1990s, 15%.ADVERTISEMENT “As soon as you lose a game, it will be on the crawl that now we only have a 19.7% chance of winning the series. Then if we win (Sunday) we’ll have a 42.7% chance of not losing the series,” said Kerr, tongue firmly planted in cheek. “This stuff is what it is. You lose a game, you come back and you try to win.”Kerr’s stance is clear: A simpler approach — study film, find ways to get better, apply them Sunday — is best.On the other hand, Golden State hadn’t lost a Game 1 this season. Or the season before that. Or the season before that.The last time the Warriors woke up and were down 1-0 in a series was the Western Conference finals in 2016 — against Kevin Durant and Oklahoma City. The Warriors responded with a blowout win in Game 2 and went on to prevail in seven games.Stephen Curry #30 of the Golden State Warriors reacts against the Toronto Raptors in the second quarter during Game One of the 2019 NBA Finals at Scotiabank Arena on May 30, 2019 in Toronto, Canada. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Gregory Shamus/Getty Images/AFP“You never lose that experience,” Warriors forward Draymond Green said. “You can always look back on it and it’s more about how you felt, what was your mindset then. But it’s impossible to be the same because it’s completely different teams. And although some of us may have that experience, others on our team have not had that experience.”It bears noting that the Raptors know a 1-0 series lead doesn’t mean much.Orlando had one of those against Toronto in the first round, and lost in five games.Milwaukee had one of those against Toronto in the Eastern Conference finals — 2-0, actually — and lost in six games.“We’ve tried to (have) a conscious thought process of not really caring what the score of the series is,” Raptors coach Nick Nurse said. “I think we know that the games are really hard. We know that after a win, the team that gets beat gets really determined. They try to fix things. They mostly play a lot harder and more physical and all those kind of things.”The challenge for his team is to do the same. That process started with a long film session Friday, and there was much to clean up. ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFPlast_img read more

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