KC hunts title sweep

first_imgKingston College (KC) coach Ludlow Bernard says that despite a 1-1 draw against St Andrew Technical High (STATHS) in the Manning Cup competition last Wednesday, the focus remains on a sweep of schoolboy titles this season. The North Street-based KC are favoured to win their first Manning Cup title in three decades. They last won the title in 1986 and expectations are very high for this year’s team. KC are in line for another Walker Cup title as they are in the ISSA/FLOW knockout competition final against Jamaica College scheduled for November 26. KC’s last hold on that title was in 2000. The KC team is also on course for a first hold on the prestigious FLOW Super Cup, which is in its third year. KC will face Wolmer’s in a quarter-final match today at Sabina Park in Kingston, starting at 7 p.m. With KC being the only Manning Cup team that can win all four titles at stake, coach Ludlow Bernard admitted that the pressure is mounting. “The pressure is always going to be there. We have risen to the moment and are unbeaten in 14 games in all competitions this season,” Bernard, who is a KC past student, told The Gleaner yesterday. “We have to be prepared as the team played 14 games in 42 days. We have to keep the players focused as it is down to the starting eleven and about three other players on the bench,” he shared about his squad of young players. Looking back at the game against STATHS three days ago at Constant Spring Sports Complex, Bernard said he tried some players and was not satisfied with their performances. “The result against STATHS was disappointing as we used some players who we put in for the first time. However, the regular players showed maturity and we came back and earned a point. I am reliant on some senior players to take us through,” he said. One of those players is midfielder Rashawn Mackison, who has scored 21 goals in all competitions. “Rashawn is stretched physically because he has played in all 14 games this season and substituted in six of them,” he pointed out about the midfielder who has done the bulk of the scoring for KC. Looking to the Super Cup game tonight against Wolmer’s, who they eliminated during the Walker Cup quarter-final, Bernard said: “We expect Wolmer’s to be coming for revenge.” “The vibe in our camp is high but one of tremendous anxiety among the supporters. They are hungry for success,” he pointed out. DISAPPOINTEDlast_img read more

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Kin Selection and Group Selection: Survival of the Fictitious

first_imgNature1 provided another case where W. D. Hamilton’s kin selection theory, which proposes that “selfish genes can lead to cooperation and altruism,” is wrong.  Kinship does not always lead to cooperation.  David C. Queller comments, “a once-heretical theory [group selection] and an unconventional social organism show that the cooperation-enhancing effect of kinship is sometimes negated.”1David C. Queller, “Social evolution: Kinship is relative,” Nature 430, 975 – 976 (26 August 2004); doi:10.1038/430975a.We appreciate the continuing efforts of the Darwin Party to undercut their own beliefs.  It saves us a lot of work.  Queller tries to claim that the case under consideration, a study of bacteria by Griffin et al., does not mean we should discard kin selection theory.  He claims it has support from studies of social insects.  But on what basis?  He claims that both kin selection theory and group selection theory are both good for each other, to “rein in” each other’s excesses: “Once, group selectionists saw cooperation everywhere but were brought down to earth by individual selectionists.  Now group selection is being used, not to show the ubiquity of cooperation but to rein in theories on an important form of cooperation envisaged by individual selectionists.”  Pardon me, David, but two wrongs don’t make a right.(Visited 6 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Audio Meters in Adobe Premiere Pro CS6

first_imgDiscover the recent changes to the audio meters in Adobe Premiere Pro CS6.  The improved meters are much easier to use and able to provide better info for audio editing.  Here’s the scoop…Audio is a very important part of video production simply because good audio carries the message and reinforces the images we work with.  Don’t make the mistake of overlooking the audio in your video editing project!  In this post, we’ll cover the changes made to the audio meters in Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 and how they can be used to improve the audio quality in your video editing.As you can see from the following pictures there have been big changes to the audio meters in Premiere Pro CS6 from previous versions.One of the biggest changes is that the meter in the main user interface now fits whatever size you make it whereas in previous versions it always stayed the same size and orientation.CS6 Audio Meters WideCS6 Audio Meters Placed Wide at the Bottom of the Work SpaceYou can see at once that this ability to re-size and fill whatever gap it is given aids tremendously in getting a far better layout for you work-space as well as allowing you to have a greater sensitivity in your view (i.e. in general longer bars are easier to see and work with than shorter bars).Another great change is that this ability to resize has been added to the whole Audio Mixer Panel which means that no matter how large you make it the meters will scale accordingly.  While not going beyond a certain point, the meters will also scale into a very small space and still be visible in CS6:CS5.5 Audio Mixer Panel LengthenedCS6 Audio Mixer Panel LengthenedCS6 Audio Mixer Panel Shortened Premiere Pro Audio Mixer PanelAs well as making the graphs much easier to use, Adobe have also added a new right-click menu which means we can have even more feedback and use out of these meters.NOTE: Make sure you are right-clicking on the black bar in the middle and not on the scale to one side as the only option you will get at that point is the ‘Safe During Write’ option.New Right-Click Menu (Audio Mixer Panel)If you choose any of the other ranges than the default 60 dB Range it won’t change the audio.  Instead it will show either a wider or a more limited range in the meter itself. So, if you have some very sensitive audio you want to work with you may find having a wider range such as the 120 dB Range easier to work with than the typical 60 dB range.Dynamic and Static Audio PeaksPeaksThe default setting in Adobe Premiere Pro is as shown above – Dynamic Peaks. What this means is that the little lines shown above will move to show the highest level that your audio gets to for a short time before falling back or moving up to a new level several seconds later. The idea behind this is to give you feedback as to how dynamic your audio is being with a peak staying put for a short while as an indication while the rest of the meter moves.However, if you want to see the maximum values for the whole piece you can change this to ‘Static Peaks‘ from the right-click menu which will mean that these peak indicators will move to the maximum level your audio gets to and simply stay there for the rest of the playback or until you right-click again and choose ‘Reset Indicators’. This can be helpful, but my own preference is to use dynamic peaks and keep the audio below the RED limit level.RED Distortion or ‘Over’ IndicatorsIf you get either of these RED indicators showing at the top of your audio meters it means that your audio for that channel has distorted and should be turned down. It is very bad to get audio peaking in this RED zone as it will play back very badly on any equipment further down the line and so should be avoided.Show Valleys in Premiere Pro‘Show Valleys‘ is very similar to the peak indicators mentioned above. The only real difference is that these indicators show the lowest point of your audio instead of the highest point. Once again, if you choose Dynamic or Static Peaks this will affect both the high peaks and the valley peaks making them persistent or transitory as needed.Audio Color GradientsThe last right-click option on an audio meter in the Premiere Audio Mixer Panel is that of either showing a color gradient or having the colors in the bar change in steps. The image below shows what it looks like with the option in steps (unchecked).Color Gradient Unchecked As you can see, the -18 dB and the -6 dB levels are really clear if you uncheck this option. However, I prefer to leave this option checked in general as it gives a nicer look to my eye and I don’t generally need to be too precise about these levels – that said, should I need to be more precise I now have the option to turn off the gradient if I wish.Lastly, if you right-click on the main Audio Meter in the normal user interface you will find that you have a couple of extra options that don’t come up when you right-click in the Audio Mixer Panel. These include:Extra Options in the Right-Click Menu for the Main UI Audio MixerSolo Channel OptionsAnother interesting feature Adobe has added, which is especially helpful when dealing with multi-channel masters and 5.1 surround-sound masters, is the ability to solo selected channels right from the audio meters. As you can see from the image below, the default setting is to have all the channels ‘soloed’ such that hitting any of the little ‘S’ buttons will turn that channel off.Monitor Mono Channels This option will only work with adaptive clips played in the Source Monitor and for sequences which have multichannel masters played in either the Source Monitor or the Timeline. What it does is allow you to play mono clips through both speakers at the same time – which can be a lot easier on the ear!Monitor Stereo PairsThis function will only work if you have a multichannel master played from the Timeline and what it does is allow you to listen to stereo linked channels instead of all the channels at the same time. For example, if your stereo pair was on channel 7 & 8 you could select to just listen to them with this option.Well, that’s a quick look at the very well redesigned audio meters in both the main user interface as well as in the Audio Mixer Panel.  As you can see, these audio improvements in Premiere Pro CS6 can be quite useful in working with audio in your video editing projects.last_img read more

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The New Sales Roles Are Taylorism Taken Too Far

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now We have sliced sales roles so thinly that the role of sales no longer makes any sense.The very limited role of BDR has been relegated to prospecting, and more specifically, qualifying. Even though being “qualified” creates no value for the prospective client, and even though their prospects avoid the appointments they agree to because the BDR has created so little value that they can’t see wasting any more time.The SDR role has morphed into something heretofore unimaginable: a sales role with little or no responsibility to prospect. The rationale is that the best value creators should only spend their time with “qualified” opportunities. The inaneness of this decision is staggering. The idea that the person who can—and should—create the most value should not prospect ignores the reality of prospecting, namely the fact that you better have deep chops and be a serious value creator, or you have no value to trade for the meeting you are requesting.The SDRs, who are supposed to occupy the high perch of trusted advisor, can offer only to bring a SME to a sales call, upon which they have become completely dependent. This, regardless of the fact that they have heard the SME’s shtick eleven times over the past three months. Sure, the salesperson should be the strategic orchestrator of the resources you need to bring to bear on an opportunity. But shouldn’t they know enough about the music being played to have a reasonable picture of what you do, how you create value, and a conversational knowledge of everything everyone on their team knows?The idea of turning opportunities over to an account executive to capture the opportunity created by another person is a strange discontinuity. The client thinks, “I was working with this person, then they brought in these experts, and now I am being handed off to a new person, one who hasn’t been involved in any of this up to the point.”Once the client is won, a new account manager enters the picture. This person is designed to handle their day-to-day needs, and the account executive and the rest of the many other “sales” people all disappear, allegedly on to hunt for the next opportunity. The account manager is supposed to be a farmer, but they are also expected to hunt inside their account, even though they don’t posses both of those skill sets.This is Taylorism taken too far. The division of labor is no longer reasonable or effective, and it it no longer considers what is necessary to serve clients, nor what is necessary to win deals.last_img read more

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