Section championship week: Shasta hosts Chico; Anderson is at Sutter Saturday

first_imgRedding >> The Red Bluff High football team knows full well just how good Shasta has been this year. The Wolves demolished the Spartans 42-7 back on Sept. 1 to set the trend for a 10-1 season and No. 1 overall seed in the Northern Section Division II playoffs. After a 49-0 win over Foothill Friday in the D-II semifinals, Shasta will play for its first title since 1988 at home Saturday against second-seeded Chico (8-3) at Thompson Field in Redding.Kickoff is set for 7 p.m. and fans attending …last_img read more

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Africa Day

first_imgLegendary jazz musician Hugh Masekela speaks about Africa Day and states his wish for an all year commemoration of the unification of Africans. The South African musician also says Africa would do well to eradicate its internal borders. Watch this video. Click arrow to play video.last_img

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Don’t discount the A380: Airbus

first_imgAirbus CEO Tom Enders. Photo: Steve Creedy. The A380 superjumbo is not dead, it’s just resting.That was the message from Airbus and one of its major customers in Toulouse on Friday as speculation continues about the superjumbo’s future.Airbus announced earlier this year that it will more than halve production of the superjumbo from the current 2.5 per month to one a month because of lacklustre demand.But Airbus chief executive Tom Enders, speaking at an event to celebrate the manufacturer’s 10,000th aircraft delivery,  predicted there would still be a demand for the A380 into the future.Read: The world needs more A380s“We’ve pulled down the rates for some time but we are very confident we will produce an aircraft for many years to come,’’ he said.Enders said Airbus was continuously making small improvements to the A380.“And we’ve said many times that bigger improvements such as the famous re-engining is not so much a question of if, but of when,’’ he said.The manufacturer’s head  salesman, John Leahy, said the A380 continued to generate passenger interest around the world.“People go out of their way to fly on the A380,’’ he said, adding that 10 per cent of passengers using London Heathrow Airport this year would be getting on or off one of the superjumbos.Singapore Airlines chief executive Goh Choon Phong said he continued to see a role for the double-decker aircraft his airline helped launch flying on high demand, high density routes where there were  slot constraints.“So we will continue to see demand for such aircraft types,’’ he said.The Singaporean carrier is acquiring five new A380s but created waves for Airbus when it decided not to renew the 10-year lease on its first Airbus A380. The announcement came as Malaysia Airlines revealed it was in discussions with airlines in the region about offloading its fleet of six A380s.SIA may also not renew four more leases due to end, although Goh reiterated that a decision on that had yet to be made.The Singaporean carrier has also said it will launch new cabin products with the arrival in the second half of next year of the first new A380.Goh said the new products, developed over “the last few years’, would wow customers and would ensure that the airline retained an industry-leading position on products.last_img read more

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Zuma talks partnerships, jobs and other things

first_imgAll of us must participate to make sure the programme we’ve put forward works – so says the president in a call for unity to meet South Africa’s potential.President Jacob Zuma called on all South Africans to participate in taking the country forward.The government was doing its part, now do your part and invest in South Africa, he said, calling on business, labour, civil society and residents to form a partnership with the state.He was speaking at a business breakfast briefing, hosted by Brand South Africa, the SABC and The New Age at Grand West Casino in Cape Town on 10 February 2012. Just a few hours before, he had said goodnight to his guests after delivering his fourth State of the Nation Address (SONA) in Parliament.The mood at Grand West was jovial; everyone was relaxed and satisfied. The president himself was fresh-faced and upbeat.At the breakfast were government ministers, deputy ministers and business people, all armed with their questions. The briefing was broadcast live on SABC, and the general public was able to send in their questions for the president on Twitter and SMS.The openness of the dialogue was precedent-setting for a sitting South African president, and certainly marked a change in the government’s way of doing business.“We want to do things differently. We want to take South Africa forward. We believe we’ve made progress, but we know that there are challenges,” he began. The government was tackling the economy in a way that it had not done in the past. “We can’t only do politics; we must also do the economy.”Zuma said the government’s major programme was infrastructure as it believed that building infrastructure would give opportunities to all.The government was creating an enabling environment and building infrastructure, and business needed to invest in opportunities that would open up. This would bring jobs and so improve the quality of life for all.“We have discussed the difficulties of doing business in South Africa. We are opening this. You must participate in this window period.”Partnership was a big theme for Zuma, who called on business to work with the government to deal with the negative impact of job losses. Training was mentioned as a possibility. “We must create the kind of projects that can create jobs.”Asked what was different for workers in his SONA – we’ve heard this all before, was the criticism – he said: “We’ve created an environment where jobs can be created. We have a massive infrastructure programme; there is money for it. The private sector must see the opportunities for investment, and invest. The logical consequence of that is jobs.“You can’t have jobs without investment and the government is creating an environment for investment.”He had three items on his wish list from the private sector: invest in the country, have confidence in the country, and big business must help small business.A hot potato issue, especially given that the Mining Indaba has just finished in Cape Town, is the nationalisation of mines. The final word on the topic came from the president. Setting many minds at rest, and garnering a round of applause, he said: “Nationalisation is not our policy. It is as clear as that. Our policy is a mixed economy.”Of potential, he said Africa was one of the fastest growing regions in the world, and we should invest in that potential. “South Africa has the potential to grow. Working together, we can take advantage of Africa, the Brics countries and the changing economy. Invest in this country; invest in your future.”Brief questionsAsked what keeps him awake at night, the president answered: the plight of the poor. “I am kept awake thinking of ways to alleviate their plight.”He pointed to South Africa’s strategic global importance in regards to shipping, saying it did nothing in its waters for its economy, despite the shipping lanes that passed the country. There were massive opportunities in this sector.Of toll roads, another hot potato, he said they were necessary for road maintenance. However, the issue was not closed. South Africa was unusual in that the government was open to discussion of ideas and policies it had put forward.In answer to a question from the floor, the president said fronting in business – whereby companies use black people as figureheads to up their black economic empowerment ratings – would be punished. The details of what that punishment would be still had to be worked out, though. The law must come first, he said, and the details would come after.Of small towns, their factories and rural areas, he said the government was talking of reviving the economy and development of those regions as part of its plan.Asked about what was being done to stop farm murders, he pointed out that as crime was falling, so were farm murders. The police were working with farmers to stop this crime.The police were also working hard to address the issue of piracy. Many raids had already been carried out.Regarding service delivery, the government had delivered to some degree, but there were still challenges. There was electricity and water available where there had been none before. “The question of infrastructure remains a challenge.”The Italian ambassador offered his country’s and Europe’s help – we could share experiences, promote investments and help you avoid the mistakes we made in industrial policy and job creation, he said, to which Zuma replied that South Africa was certainly keen to learn what went wrong, and what would happen to alleviate the present economic crisis.Questioned about land reform, Zuma again spoke of the Green Paper on Land Reform he had mentioned in his SONA. “We are looking at those issues,” he said. “The fact is that lots of land was taken away and many people were left landless. We can’t let this continue. We need frank views from South Africans on how to solve land issues.”last_img read more

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Social Media Gives New Life To Photo-Printing Services

first_imgTags:#Photo Sharing Services#web Facebook members are uploading about 300 million photos every day, giving an unexpected new life to companies that print photos.Brent Busboom, a 42-year-old high school English teacher in Reno, Nev., said he has printed four photo books as gifts for people in the past two years. He loves the ease with which he can share photos on Facebook, but still prints his most treasured digital snapshots.“Truthfully, it’s easier to look at photos in a photobook than it is on a website since I don’t have to wait for pictures to load. Plus, photobooks are a huge improvement over photo albums where everything was the same size,” Busboom said. “The ability to manipulate photo sizes and layouts lets me structure things in a way that is both interesting and representative.”Photo-sharing technology was supposed to make the printed photo go the way of the CD and the daily newspaper. You need look no further than the high-profile bankruptcies of Kodak and Polaroid, stalwarts of the film-and-processing era, to see the impact digital cameras and faster Internet connections had on photo prints.But now a new breed of smaller, more nimble photo companies are making it easier for photographers to turn their favorite Facebook, Instagram and Google+ photos into prints, canvases and photo books. By tying directly into the social networks, companies like Blurb and CanvasPop eliminate the laborious step of having users upload photos for printing.The result? Internet research firm InfoTrends is predicting the photobook market will grow from $588.1 million in 2010 to $1.2 billion by 2015.Chris Sonjeow co-founded Picbound.com, a photo-book printing company earlier this year, right around the time Facebook was announcing a billion-dollar deal to acquire photo app Instagram. He said the company plays on the “grandma factor,” or the fact that many people still prefer prints over pixels, and the idea that many photos shared on Facebook are mundane daily events; a photo book gives a sense of importance to photos from a life event.“Will this always be the case? Most likely not, but it will certainly not change overnight. The phasing-out period lasts decades,” Sonejow said. “Sure, there will always be people who collect vinyl records or old books, but once the general masses have a more consistent form of access, they will eventually have a new way to view their past.”  Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img dave copeland Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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