Paco Jémez: “This is my most difficult year as a coach”

first_imgFUTURE “We want to finish the championship, but with zero risk for everyone” -This is not your first extreme situation, you have already experienced an earthquake in Mexico. EPIDEMIC “This teaches us that we are more vulnerable than we think” BALANCE -That earthquake also took the lives of many people. This teaches us that we are much more vulnerable than we think and much more stupid than we think. The moral is that we should enjoy our life more, which is spectacular. There are people who have died overnight. This should serve to help us more. The pity is that this happens and people forget.-Bukaneros put up a banner in support of the toilets in Infanta Leonor and Vallecas is showing solidarity.-It makes me proud, but it doesn’t surprise me. I know the people of Vallecas: humble and always ready to help. It is in your genes. It is a reason for satisfaction that is seen in the rest of Spain.-What is your assessment of the season so far?-It has been marked more by the extra sports than by the sport. We would like to be higher, but we have games ahead to achieve our goal. It has been a very bumpy campaign in everything and we can still fight to get into the top six. If we finish LaLiga, we will continue with the same idea. The team had a good dynamic and now everything stops suddenly. That makes the championship equal again.-Diagnosed Rayo fear of winning, why is it happening?-I can’t find any explanation. This team had to have won many more games, although it is true that it has lost few. Rayo has the potential to earn more and be higher. It costs him and I take some of the responsibility as a coach. We will continue working.center_img “The course has been more marked by the outside than by the sport” -How are these days being put at home?-We are living a situation that we had only seen in the movies. Every day I talk to Dr. Beceiro, in contact with the players in case they have symptoms, and with Cobeño, so they can keep me up to date. So far so good. Julio Muñoz (physical trainer) He has given them a planning, knowing what they have at home, so that they move a little and do not lose the general tone.-What guidelines have you given to the squad?-There are some who live in houses with a garden and others, in an apartment. We have told them to do sit-ups, self-loading … although it doesn’t make much sense. This is going to take a long time.-If LaLiga returns, would they need a preseason?-It will depend on how long we are unemployed, but if it were extended from four to six weeks we would already need a preseason to start.– It is spoken of the physical effects, and the psychological ones?-It is a new situation to which we have to adapt, due to force majeure. We have also given them these habits to keep them entertained at home, but we are talking about soccer when that is not really important, but to stop the coronavirus epidemic and emerge victorious from something that, at first, we had not taken very seriously . -This break can serve to recover Comesaña and Pozo.-All the teams are in that position. It is time that the injured can take advantage to recover, but we do not know how much. For them it is good because they did not expect it.– How it is seeing the winter signings?-I value them all very positively. They have fitted the team very well and we hope that, in this final stretch, they will bring us numbers and game. Of course, in terms of assists and goals, I am very demanding. We must continue working and improving. I still think there is a very good group and I am proud to be their coach.-The problem is that Embarba’s shadow is long: Rayo has lost 26% of goal.We knew that his loss would do us great harm. They have paid ten million for him, which is worth his numbers. To get them back you have to bring players of their level and those cost eight, ten or twelve million. This in football is pure mathematics. -How is a day in Paco’s life during this confinement?-I’m home alone. My daughter is a stone’s throw away, but I can’t go see her. She lives in Madrid and, in a sensible act, she has not gone to A Coruña, where my wife and my other daughter are. My mother and brother are in Córdoba. So I have everyone scattered. I call them every day and if they are well, I adapt to anything.-And what activities do you do?-I do sports at home, I had some gadgets and I have prepared a makeshift gym. And thank goodness we have the internet and books! The day you go to the supermarket you take the opportunity to stretch your legs and breathe clean air. This is the closest thing to being in prison.-Do you agree that the clubs do the tests?-I thank LaLiga and Thebes for caring about us, but I see it unnecessary to undergo tests that should be kept for people with symptoms. If we get sick, we have our doctor, who will guide us.-Do you think that LaLiga will resume?-No one knows the timing of this. Many jobs can be done from home, but we can’t get 40 together in a locker room. The Euro Cup has been suspended and we are already looking at the medium-long term. We have to get the short film out of our heads. If then we have to make an effort and play in the summer, it will be done. No problem. We want to end the season and we will do everything possible, but in conditions of zero risk for everyone. If you finally cannot, you will have to find solutions that surely will not be liked by anyone. -It was an ‘annus horribilis’: the animation strike, the sanction for the insults to Zozulia, the Advíncula Case, four serious injuries …-It’s being complete, yes. It has not been that perfect year in which everything blows in favor. Upside down. But far from complaining, we have worked. That is why I give so much importance to what the team is doing and the possibilities it has. We will fight against all odds.– It is being your most difficult season at the helm of Rayo?-It’s the most difficult since I started training.-He confessed that he had no relationship with the president, is there anything new about it?-There are no changes.last_img read more

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Worrisome nonstick chemicals are common in US drinking water federal study suggests

first_imgImani/Unsplash Click to view the privacy policy. 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Country By Natasha Gilbert Feb. 8, 2019 , 3:30 PM In recent weeks, the leadership of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Washington, D.C., has been dithering on whether to protect drinking water from unregulated industrial chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). Meanwhile, the agency’s scientists have found that the compounds are more widespread in drinking water than they previously knew.PFAS chemicals are widely used to make nonstick and water-proof products, including foams used to fight fires. Two of the most common forms—perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)—are no longer made in the United States, but in some cases have been replaced by related chemicals. The compounds can persist in the environment for decades and have been found in many drinking water supplies. That has raised health concerns because studies have linked PFAS to cancer and developmental defects.EPA is facing pressure to set a national limit on PFAS concentrations in drinking water. (Some states have already set their own limits.) But the agency has not yet acted, and has disputed reports that it will not issue a standard. In the meantime, many communities have been pushing officials to test water supplies in order to document the extent of any contamination. Email A study quietly released earlier this month by scientists at EPA and the United States Geological Survey suggests the chemicals are widespread. They found some combination of 14 PFAS compounds in all 50 drinking water samples they tested, a dramatic jump from a similar 2016 study that used less sensitive testing methods and found the chemicals in less than 3% of samples.The researchers took two samples at 25 water treatment plants; one of water before it had been treated, and the other after treatment. Just one sample contained PFOA concentrations above 70 nanograms per liter (ng/l), the level EPA currently considers an “advisory” threshold, they report in Science of the Total Environment. (That EPA level is far too high, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta concluded in a study.) The researchers also measured concentrations of three other PFAS compounds that exceeded 70 ng/l, but the government has set no advisory standards for these compounds.The study helps highlight “how widespread PFAS are in the environment,” says Jamie DeWitt, an environmental toxicologist at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina, who was not involved in the work. And it suggests that “PFOA and PFOS are not the only PFAS that we should be concerned about.”The study does not indicate how many people might be drinking the tested water, because the sampling locations are confidential. But using 2016 data collected by federal scientists, the Environmental Working Group (EWG), an advocacy group based in Washington, D.C., estimates that up to 110 million people are served by water supplies with PFAS.Olga Naidenko, EWG’s senior science adviser, notes that it is unusual for researchers to detect PFAS chemicals in drinking water above the EPA advisory level. And she believes the agency’s existing advisory levels for PFOS and PFOA “are not sufficiently protective.” Communities with high concentrations, she says, should be informed.The stakes surrounding studies of PFAS prevalence, concentrations, and human health impacts are immense. Stricter standards could force U.S. drinking water suppliers to spend hundreds of billions of dollars to remove the chemicals. And they could require those who used the chemicals—including industrial facilities, fire fighters, and the U.S. military—to pay for cleanups and potentially even damages for people who can show their health was harmed by the substances.last_img read more

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