Assam begins deleting foreigners from NRC list

first_imgThose excluded from final NRC can appeal in Foreigners Tribunal: Home Minister  “The civil administration had filed 24 cases against such people when the NRC first draft was being published. There papers were found to be forged,” the district’s Superintendent of Police Ankur Jain told The Hindu.Some of these people have since obtained bail from the Gauhati High Court and the lower courts, he said.NRC Assam’s State Coordinator Prateek Hajela had on July 2 submitted before the Supreme Court that some 1.5 lakh would be deleted from the first draft due to various anomalies. The first draft, published on December 31, 2017, had the names of 1.9 crore of a total 3.29 applicants.The 1.5 lakh included 65,694 cases of “family tree mismatch” while 48,456 cases were of married women who had submitted doubtful panchayat certificates. Another 19,783 were left out because of data entry errors. District officials in Assam have begun work to delete the names of ‘declared foreigners’ whose names had been included in the complete draft of the updated National Register of Citizens (NRC) that was published on July 30.In central Assam’s Morigaon district, officials have identified some 200 people declared foreigners by various Foreigners’ Tribunals or facing cases related to their doubtful citizenship.Assam has 100 such tribunals where people of suspect nationality are required to prove they are Indians.Also Read  200 in Morigaon“These 200 belong to 39 families scattered across the district. Some of them are declared foreigners while some others are suspected illegal immigrants with cases pending,” Morigaon Deputy Commissioner Hemen Das said.“Their detection was not based on any complaint. A mechanism we have in place helped us find their names in the draft NRC. We are deleting their names from the list suo motu so that people don’t lose their faith in the system,” he said. However, he declined to reveal their names or their villages of residence for “security reasons”.Fake papers in HojaiThe police in central Assam’s Hojai district too have filed charge-sheets against 91 people who had submitted fake documents while applying for NRC.Also Read The citizenry test: Assam NRC explained last_img read more

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In small interactions before Olympics, Korean unity emerges

first_imgPolice teams find crossbows, bows in HK university PLAY LIST 01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding View comments Read Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. The South Korean pair of Kam Alex Kang Chan and Kim Kyu-eun shared the same ice with North Korea’s Kim Ju Sik and Ryom Tae Ok for the first time. Before training earlier this week, Kam and Kim used the same locker room and put on skates early so they had spare time together.Then Kam, 22, proposed taking a selfie together. He called the 25-year-old Kim “hyeong,” a Korean term used to refer to an elder brother or friend.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“I said something like ‘Hey, Ju Sik hyeong, let’s take a photo together!’” Kam said after training Tuesday. “I posted that photo for fun … and to mark the Olympics.”The photo recalls a famous 2016 selfie taken by two North and South Korean gymnasts at the Rio Olympics—something that IOC President Thomas Bach described as a “great gesture.” Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH North Korea’s Ryom Tae Ok and Kim Ju Sik, center, practice next to South Korea’s Kim Kyu-eun, front right, and Alex Kam during a pairs figure skating training session prior to the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 5, 2018. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)GANGNEUNG, South Korea—A lot can be contained in a single selfie. The possibilities for peace between two entire nations, even.A selfie taken by smiling North and South Korean skaters and posted on Instagram illustrates yet another moment of reconciliation between the rivals, whose decades-long animosities could easily erupt again after the Pyeongchang Olympics.ADVERTISEMENT NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencerscenter_img Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting That was certainly at play Monday when four North and South Korean hockey players who didn’t take part in the session took a selfie and laughed together. Also grabbing attention: earlier photos of birthday parties thrown for two North Korean players, and a dictionary aimed at overcoming a linguistic divide.“Hockey really does bring people together,” said the team’s Canadian coach, Sarah Murray. “On our team, they are just players. You know … there is no North Korean or South Korean. They are all wearing the same jersey. We are all on the same team.”On Thursday, in another unusual spectacle, North Korea’s national anthem was played and its flag was hoisted alongside an Olympic flag during a boisterous welcoming ceremony for athletes from the North. South Korea has strict security laws that normally ban the playing of the North’s anthem and the raising of its flag .A group of South Korean B-boys, or break dancers, twisted their bodies and flipped relentlessly after walking into the center of a group of North Korean athletes. A North Korean band played the Korean folk tune “Arirang.” North Korean athletes hummed to themselves before starting to dance. South Korean dancers joined them, triggering a barrage of camera flashes.“I feel so good,” North Korean figure skating coach Kim Hyon Son said after the ceremony. “I want to see both North and South Korean people being pleased.”The feel-good sparks will peak during the opening ceremony on Friday, when athletes of the Koreas will march together under a single “unification flag” to the tune of “Arirang” instead of their respective anthems. It will be the first such joint march since 2007.It’s unclear what other Olympic moments involving the two countries could make news, particularly because the hockey team isn’t expected to win a medal.“Quite strangely, no medal, no issue,” said Jung Moon-hyun, a sports science professor at Chungnam National University in South Korea. “Whether North Korea does some action that pours cold water on the Olympic (reconciliation mood) is something to think about.”But Jung said even one win by the team will be “very meaningful” news. On Feb. 14, the Korean team faces Japan, which colonized Korea for more than three decades before it split into North and South shortly after World War II.When the Games end, North and South Korean players will be separated, probably for good. Their governments ban ordinary citizens from exchanging phone calls, letters and emails, so they won’t communicate unless they encounter each other in international competitions. Aldridge, Spurs hand Suns their most one-sided loss ever Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises AFP official booed out of forum Similar amicable interactions are visible among the North and South Korean female hockey players, who have formed the rivals’ first joint Olympic team.The team of 12 North Koreans and 23 South Koreans was composed last month as the Koreas agreed upon a package of reconciliation steps following a year of heightened nuclear tensions that triggered fears of war on the Korean Peninsula.Many experts have raised worries about teamwork, and a survey showed a majority of South Korean opposed the joint team. Why? They thought it would deprive South Korean athletes of playing time.At the height of their Cold War rivalry, sports were often an alternate battlefield between the Koreas. North Korean medalists often ignored South Korean competitors who extended their hands for handshakes at podiums. North Korea also boycotted the 1986 Asian Games and the 1988 Olympics, both held in Seoul.Since the Cold War, though, the countries have sometimes used sports as a way to thaw relations.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES For now, though, things like congenial selfies will have to be enough. The South Korean media certainly liked the latest one showing Kam and Kim flashing smiles and making peace signs. It was reproduced all over the country.The Seoul-based Kookmin Ilbo newspaper even gave it a memorable moniker, a sign of hope after generations of Korean division: “The icon of new peace.”last_img read more

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‘Lesson learned’: Early setbacks in 2019 won’t deter Team Lakay

first_imgFrom left: Team Lakay’s Joshua Pacio, Geje Eustaquio, Mark Sangiao, Kevin Belingon, Eduard Folayang, and Stephen Loman hoist their hardwares. Denison Rey A. Dalupang/INQUIRERTeam Lakay head coach Mark Sangiao isn’t the type who dwells on the past especially if it involves his fighters losing two world titles in just a six-day span.Instead, Sangiao would rather focus on the present and future of his prized warriors.ADVERTISEMENT View comments ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war But if there’s a blueprint for Team Lakay to follow and overcome adversities, the famed stable doesn’t need to look far.“These setbacks are not a reason for us to stop. Like Geje Eustaquio said, Eduard Folayang didn’t become a world champion until he was 34 years old,” he said.“This is a lesson learned. We have such huge respect for ONE Championship and we are very thankful to the organization for giving us these opportunities.”Sangiao has no doubt his fighters have what it takes to bounce back.“Others wouldn’t know what it took us to get here,” Sangiao said. “It’s so hard for us, but we have to remain positive and rise again.”ADVERTISEMENT PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss MOST READ Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town LATEST STORIES Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusationscenter_img “Things happen, it’s been done. We can be mad, but doing so could only lead to losing ourselves. There is no going back so the best thing to do is to work hard again. My only plea is to give the athletes what they deserve. It’s painful,” Sangiao said.“Like I said, what they do is not easy. They have to go through so many sacrifices and what they do is something that ordinary people can’t do. The hardship they go through each day is unreal. So again, I hope they give the athletes what they rightfully deserve.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsLast Friday, Geje Eustaquio lost his ONE world flyweight title to Brazilian rival Adriano Moraes before a hometown crowd at Mall of Asia Arena.Eustaquio’s unanimous decision loss also came just six days after teammate Joshua Pacio yielded the strawweight strap to Japanese strongman Yosuke Saruta in Jakarta, Indonesia by split decision. SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Dani Ravena has had enough of bashers saying her family paid for spot in Ateneo roster US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrantslast_img read more

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