CSL Completes Historic Maritime Transhipment Operation …

first_img此页面无法正确加载 Google 地图。您是否拥有此网站?确定 My location CSL, January 16, 2014 zoom Canada Steamship Lines (CSL) successfully completed the first ever loading of a Chinamax class dry bulk vessel in North America, performed by the CSL’s self-unloading vessel, the CSL Spirit. During this historic maritime transhipment operation in the Bay of Sept-Îles, Québec, 302,264 metric tonnes of iron ore were loaded by the CSL Spirit onto the CSB Years, one of the largest vessels in the world.“We are very proud of the key role CSL has played in this record-breaking achievement, and are grateful to the dedicated teams, both on the ground and onboard the CSL Spirit and CSB Years, for carrying out this complex operation,” stated Louis Martel, President of Canada Steamship Lines. “This massive undertaking highlights the flexibility, reliability and efficiency that can be expected from CSL’s transhipment services, and marks a significant milestone for CSL and for shipping in Canada.”Equipped with a telescopic, center-mounted discharge boom, the Panamax-sized CSL Spirit is well suited for the large-scale iron ore transhipment operation, which was performed for Cliffs Natural Resources in December 2013.“In our many years of working with CSL, Cliffs recognizes the company’s constant drive for innovation and solutions-based approaches to facing challenges head on,” remarked William Miller, Vice-President, Transportation, Cliffs Natural Resources. “CSL’s innovative spirit and technical competence gave us the confidence that the operation would be carried out efficiently, reliably, and most importantly, safely.”Once loaded, the CSB Year, owned by China Shipping Bulk Carrier Company, set sail for China where her iron ore cargo will be delivered to Wuhan Iron and Steel Company (WISCO).A pioneer in transhipment and cargo top-off operations around the globe, CSL performs and oversees such operations in Canada, Australia, Indonesia, the United States and Africa, handling more than thirty million tonnes of cargo annually. Print  Closelast_img read more

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Issues faced by detainees to be discussed at Colombo conference

Sri Lanka is to host the third Asia- Pacific Regional Correctional Managers Conference from 10-13 May 2016 with the support of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), the ICRC said today.Nearly 50 senior officials from the Ministry of Prison Reforms, Resettlement, Rehabilitation and Hindu Religious Affairs, the Department of Prisons and the Bureau of the Commissioner General of Rehabilitation in Sri Lanka, and from the prisons departments of Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines and Thailand will attend the seminar. ICRC delegations from most of these countries will also be represented at the event. The first Asia- Pacific conference was held in 2012 in Manila, Philippines and the second in 2013 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Both focused on the issue of overcrowding in prisons.“This event in Sri Lanka, which builds on the success of the two previous conferences, provides a unique opportunity for senior prison managers to share experiences, challenges and best practices”, said Claire Meytraud, the head of the ICRC delegation in Sri Lanka.“We are committed to working closely with the authorities of all these countries and to supporting their efforts to improve conditions of detention.” Discussions will focus on the classification of detainees, prison design, the specific needs of women, trends in health care, medical ethics and strategic planning for change. The theme of the conference is “Balancing Security and Humanitarian Needs in Prisons”. “The Government of Sri Lanka is keen to undertake prison reforms to ensure improved humanitarian conditions, that there is no overcrowding in prisons and that the categorization of detainees is in line with offences so that prisons can be managed more efficiently and effectively”, the Minister of Prison Reforms, Resettlement, Rehabilitation and Hindu Religious Affairs D.M. Swaminathan said.“Additionally, detainees should be assured of proper vocational training, counselling, sufficient time for family visits and access to legal aid and adequate medical facilities, while carrying out police searches to detect the use of drugs in prisons. Against this backdrop, the Asia- Pacific Regional Correctional Managers Conference will help countries to share lessons learnt and to formulate reforms that will make prisons more effective correctional centres”. In Sri Lanka, the ICRC has been visiting places of detention since 1989 in keeping with its global humanitarian mandate; the aim is to help the authorities to provide adequate conditions of detention and humane treatment for all detainees. read more

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