Which football club is the richest in the world?

first_imgLiving in an era of football where money defines pretty much all corners of the sport, where defenders are being bought and sold for as much as £80 million (€88m/$108m), finances mean everything. Each transfer window brings bigger sums, and the prices don’t seem to be dropping anytime soon. Once considered a large amount, £50m (€55m/$61m) payouts for players have been deemed as the norm, and player contracts grow even more lucrative with each passing year.  But which football club is the richest in the world?  Article continues below Editors’ Picks Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Ox-rated! Dream night in Genk for Liverpool ace after injury nightmare Messi a man for all Champions League seasons – but will this really be Barcelona’s? The Deloitte Football Money League, now in its 22nd edition, ranks the top 20 clubs by revenue in world football. Deloitte’s findings in the latest edition of their Football Money League, published in January 2019, show that Real Madrid are the richest club in the world after they generated €750.9m (£685.1m/$833.6m) in revenue in the 2017-18 season, which set a new record.The revenue figures are extracted from the annual financial statements of the company or group that owns each club, along with other direct sources, for the 2017-18 season. There are a multitude of ways to measure a club’s financial performance, but for Deloitte, revenue has been used as the most easily available and comparable measure of financial performance.  Los Blancos were followed by rivals Barcelona (€690.4m) and Manchester United (€666m). The gap between the top two richest clubs was the second-largest yet, with €61.5m separating Real Madrid and Barcelona. It is the 12th time that Madrid topped the rankings, and the first time since the 2014-15 season. The club were boosted by their Champions League success, winning their third straight European title and their fourth in five years under Zinedine Zidane. Real Madrid Champions League 2018The Liga giants experienced enormous commercial growth of €54.8m, which included an increase in sponsorship and merchandising revenues, in addition to the revenue earned from their international pre-season tour matches. All 20 of the clubs represented in the standings come from Europe’s ‘big five’ leagues. Nine of the 20 teams in the rankings hail from the Premier League, while four of the teams are from Italy, three from Spain, three from Germany, and one from France. German champions Bayern are positioned after Man Utd in the fourth spot, and they are followed immediately by Abu Dhabi-owned Manchester City, Qatar-owned PSG and Premier League heavyweights Liverpool, Chelsea, Arsenal and Tottenham.”At the top, we have seen Real Madrid shatter records, becoming the first club to break the three-quarters of a billion-Euro mark and claim a record 12th Money League title in the process,” said Dan Jones, a partner in the Sports Business Group at Deloitte.He added: “Real Madrid’s outstanding financial performance in 2017-18 is built on their long history of success on the pitch, most recently three consecutive Champions League titles. This has enabled the club to continue to drive commercial revenue as the appetite to partner with Europe’s most successful clubs remains stronger than ever.”Europe’s top 20 richest football teams Pos Club 2017-18 Revenue (€m) 2016-17 Revenue (€m) 1 (2) Real Madrid 750.9  674.6 2 (3) Barcelona 690.4  648.3 3 (1) Manchester United 666  676.3 4 (4) Bayern 629.2  587.8 5 (5) Manchester City 568.4  527.7 6 (7) Paris Saint-Germain 541.7  486.2 7 (9) Liverpool 513.7  424.2 8 (8) Chelsea 505.7  428 9 (6) Arsenal 439.2  487.6 10 (11) Tottenham  428.3  359.5 11 (10) Juventus 394.9  405.7 12 (12) Borussia Dortmund 317.2  332.6 13 (13) Atletico Madrid 304.4  272.5 14 (15) Inter 280.8  262.1 15 (n/a) Roma 250  171.8 16 (16) Schalke 243.8  230.2 17 (20) Everton 212.9  199.2 18 (n/a) Milan 207.7  191.7 19 (n/a) Newcastle 201.5  99.7 20 (17) West Ham 197.9  213.3last_img read more

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FAA proposes to fine Southwest Airlines 12 million for improper repairs to

FAA proposes to fine Southwest Airlines $12 million for improper repairs to airliners AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email by Joan Lowy, The Associated Press Posted Jul 28, 2014 12:15 pm MDT WASHINGTON – The Federal Aviation Administration said Monday it is proposing a $12 million civil fine against Southwest Airlines for failing to comply with safety regulations related to repairs on Boeing 737 jetliners.It is the second-largest fine the agency has proposed against an airline. The largest proposed fine was against American Airlines for $24.2 million in August 2010. That one was ultimately settled for $24.9 million as part of American’s bankruptcy proceedings, although the final settlement included other safety violations not part of the original proposal.The FAA said that beginning in 2006 Southwest made “extreme makeover” alterations to eliminate potential cracking of the aluminum skin on 44 jetliners. An FAA investigation determined that Southwest’s contractor, Aviation Technical Services Inc. of Everett, Washington, failed to follow proper procedures for replacing the fuselage as well as other work on the planes, the agency said. All of the work was done under the supervision of Southwest, which was responsible for seeing that it was done properly, the FAA said.Southwest, which is based in Dallas, then returned the planes to service in 2009 and began flying them even after the FAA “put the airline on notice that these aircraft were not in compliance” with safety regulations, the agency said.During its investigation, the FAA also found that Aviation Technical Services’ workers applied sealant beneath the new skin panels but did not install fasteners in all of the rivet holes fast enough for the sealant to be effective.“This could have resulted in gaps between the skin and the surface to which it was being mounted. Such gaps could allow moisture to penetrate the skin and lead to corrosion,” FAA said.The contractor also failed to follow requirements to properly place the planes on jacks and shore them up while the work was being performed, the FAA said. If a plane is shored improperly during skin replacement, the airframe could shift and lead to subsequent problems with the new skin.The FAA also said that Southwest failed to properly install a ground wire on water drain masts on two of its Boeing 737s in response to a safety order aimed at preventing lightning strikes. The planes were each operated on more than 20 passenger flights after Southwest Airlines became aware of the discrepancies but before the airline corrected the problem, the agency said.“The FAA views maintenance very seriously, and it will not hesitate to take action against companies that fail to follow regulations,” said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta.Southwest Airlines has 30 days to respond to the proposed fine. Usually FAA officials negotiate extensively with an airline in cases of large fines before settling upon an amount. However, regulators and airline officials sometimes are unable to reach an agreement and the airline contests the fine.Brandi King, a spokeswoman for Southwest, said the airline will “respond to the FAA allegations” in accordance with the agency’s procedures.“Having fully resolved the repair issues some time ago, none of the items raised in the FAA letter affect aircraft currently being operated by Southwest Airlines,” she said. “As always, Southwest is committed to continuously making enhancements to our internal procedures, as well as improvements related to oversight of our repair vendors.”___Follow Joan Lowy on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/AP_Joan_Lowy_ read more

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