Security Council backs focus of southern African summit on conflict in DR

“Members of the Security Council expressed full support to the Heads of State and Government of the SADC [Southern African Development Community] for their strenuous efforts in finding a solution to the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo,” the Council’s current President, Ambassador Jagdish Koonjul of Mauritius, said in a press statement. The SADC Extraordinary Summit Meeting to discuss conflict situations in the region will be held on 14 January in Malawi.

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Consumers vote to keep the motor industry block exemption

90 per cent feel it is important that there is a local brand specific outlet in case of problems when travelling locally and abroad. Commenting on the research, SMMT Chief Executive Christopher Macgowan said, ‘These findings fly in the face of reports that block exemption works against the consumer interest. Car buyers here and in the rest of Europe recognise that competition is strong and are not afraid to bargain hard for the best deal. They also understand the technical complexity of a unique product that is best served by a well-trained, dedicated sales and aftersales network. This report shows that consumers are keen for it to continue.’ * * * * * Notes to editors. A report that focuses on attitudes to new car distribution shows that consumers want to keep the industry’s ‘block exemption’. The findings contradict the view that dealer networks have failed car buyers and that the distribution system should be scrapped in 2002.Published by Taylor Nelson Sofres, the report follows extensive research in the five major European car markets, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK. In each country, consumers felt that selective and exclusive distribution best suited the technical complexity of motor vehicles.Strong competition between different makes of car was highlighted as a key benefit of the current system. The convenience of dealer networks was also felt to be important and over a third of buyers reported visiting at least two dealerships of the same make to research and negotiate the best possible deal.Other findings show that the so-called ‘sales and servicing link’ is highly valued. Franchised dealer services are seen as part of the overall package when buying a new car. Consumers also recognise the role of manufacturers in maintaining high standards of dealer selection, training and after sales care.Facts and figures: 35 per cent of Europeans visited at least two dealerships representing the make they bought. 71 per cent of UK customers negotiated on price. Over 800 new car buyers were polled in each country. Block exemption operates throughout the European Union. The rules permit selective and exclusive distribution of motor vehicles through franchised dealer networks. Similar systems operate in the US and Japan. 59 per cent of Europeans and 55 per cent of UK customers prefer to service within the franchised network after expiry of the warranty. 83 per cent polled agreed with the statement ‘Getting the maintenance or repairs carried out by a garage of the same make, it is for me an additional guarantee’. 80 per cent of Europeans think that competition between brands is strong. In the UK the figure is 73 per cent. 76 per cent considered that competition has increased during the last decade. Taylor Nelson Sofres Automotive is the fourth largest market research company in the world. www.tnsofres.com Consumers rejected new car sales through supermarkets. They felt less confident about their ability to match franchised dealer standards, reporting negative feelings for quality of aftersales service, repair safety and provision of technical information. The five countries polled represent over 80 per cent of new car sales in Europe. 71 per cent of all polled agree with the statement ‘When I buy a car I also buy the dealership for maintenance of the brand’. The current block exemption regulation, EC 1475/95, will be reviewed in September 2002. Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) read more

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Papa Johns founder gives 1M to historically black college

Schnatter stepped down as CEO of the Louisville-based pizza chain in 2017 and later resigned as its chair after blaming disappointing sales on the NFL player protests and using the N-word during a company conference call .WLKY-TV reports Simmons is Kentucky’s only private historically black college. The Courier Journal reports Schnatter left the announcement event without speaking with reporters.(Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) – The founder of Papa John’s has donated $1 million to a historically black college in Kentucky after more than a year of backlash for his use of a racial slur.News outlets report John Schnatter announced the donation Wednesday at Simmons College of Kentucky. The college’s president, the Rev. Kevin Cosby, and its board of trustees chairman, Mark Lynn, emphasized that people should focus on Schnatter’s actions and not his words.- Advertisement – read more

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As Hale takes her leave Brock announces the new Dean of Humanities

Brock’s next Dean of Humanities will be Douglas Kneale, an accomplished scholar from the University of Western Ontario (UWO) who takes up his new duties on July 1. Kneale has taught in UWO’s Department of English for 25 years, including five years as chair of the department.Douglas KnealeKneale was one of two decanal appointments made today by Brock. It was also announced that Fiona Blaikie will become the new Dean of Education on Aug. 1.In Humanities, Kneale will replace outgoing Dean Rosemary Hale, who is completing a second consecutive five-year term as Dean of the faculty. Hale, who retains a tenured position at Brock, will commence an administrative leave this summer.Kneale is an award-winning teacher whose research stretches from Wordsworth and Milton to psychoanalysis and the history of rhetoric. He has published books on English Romanticism and contributed peer-reviewed essays to top-ranked journals and volumes around the world.He said he is “thrilled to be joining Brock as its next Dean of Humanities.”“I believe that we are entering a very creative period in Brock’s history,” he said. “I look forward to working with students, faculty, and staff at Brock and with our many partners in the Niagara community to help us reach our enormous combined potential.”Besides academic credentials, Kneale brings considerable administrative experience, having sat on numerous committees at UWO, including the Appointments, Promotion and Tenure Committee and the Budget and Development Committee.Before joining UWO’s faculty in 1985, Kneale (BA, UWO 1978; MA, UWO 1979; PhD, University of Toronto 1983) taught at Yale University (Fall 1984), Bishop’s (1983-84) and at University of Toronto (1979-82).The announcement was made by Murray Knuttila, Brock’s Provost and Vice-President, Academic. He welcomed the new Dean and also acknowledged the contributions of Hale, who tirelessly pushed for the creation of a new Marilyn I. Walker School of Fine and Performing Arts campus in downtown St. Catharines.“There are some big shoes to fill,” Knuttila said. “We all know, and will sorely miss, Rosemary Hale’s indomitable passion, creativity and commitment to her faculty and to the university.“But in preparing for our next chapter, I am very enthused about Dr. Kneale’s arrival. And he is likewise excited about the future of the university and particularly the Faculty of Humanities, as it undertakes such major initiatives as hosting the 2014 Social Sciences and Humanities Conference, and building the new Walker campus downtown.”Get The Brock News delivered to your email. read more

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Buckeyes open Big Ten play at home defeat Nebraska 8453

Sophomore guard Amedeo Della Valle, 33, drives towards the basket. OSU defeated Nebraska, 84-53 at the Schottenstein Center Jan. 4. Credit: Kaily Cunningham / Multimedia EditorThe No. 3 ranked Ohio State Buckeyes defense stepped up big once again, bringing the team’s record to 15-0, and 2-0 in conference play. The Buckeyes continued their winning streak Saturday, defeating Nebraska, 84-53.Despite a slow start for both teams, the Buckeyes began to pull away toward the end of the first half. Scoring the last seven points of the half, the Buckeyes went into the second half with a 10 point lead.The Buckeyes played more than adequately on defense against the Cornhuskers, only allowing Nebraska to shoot 32.1 percent in the second half, and only 1-7 outside the arch. Strong defensive play is exactly what the Buckeyes will need when they travel to East Lansing Tuesday to take on the No. 5 Michigan State Spartans.The Buckeyes offense wasn’t slacking either.Sophomore guard Amedeo Della Valle came off the bench and dominated the Nebraska defense, going 3-3 from outside the arch and 2-3 from the free throw line. Della Valle led the Buckeyes in scoring with 15 points.“He wants to contribute, he wants to be apart of what we’re doing. He’s diligent in his work and for him to be banging shots like that, that’s what we need him to do for us,“ said coach Thad Matta of the sophomore from Alba, Italy.Freshmen forward Marc Loving, who came in to score 13 points also felt the bench stepping up for the team today was a factor in their victory.“We just try to bring a lot of energy to the game, we feel like our energy off the bench can affect the game in a major way,” said Loving.Being able to rely on their bench more throughout the season is another attribute the Buckeyes can use to their advantage come against the Spartans.Nebraska head coach Tim Miles was aware of his team’s lack of confidence toward the games end, but said a defense like OSU’s can wear you down.“Ohio State’s 2 or 3 or whatever you want to call it, in the country, and you’re going to pay the price,” Miles said.But Miles said the Buckeyes strong play against his team is more than enough to prepare OSU for continued Big Ten success.“If they can turn Michigan State over like they turned us over, then I think that’s going to cause problems for any team,” Miles said.Turnovers were a huge cause for momentum for the Buckeyes, adding 17 points to their score.Matta is hoping that momentum carries into Tuesday’s game.The Spartans are undefeated in conference, but are 13-1 on the season, with their only loss to North Carolina in the Big Ten-ACC challenge last month.The Buckeyes and Spartans are set to play at 9 p.m. read more

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Queens Guardsman grabbed a police officer round the throat while another soldier

first_imgMr Ahmaz said White had been a Guardsman for two years, while Holland had been one for just 13 months, a “position he sought since childhood.”Sentencing McLaughlin to an 18-month community order and 120 hours unpaid work, Magistrate Christina Townsend said: “We are going to impose a blanket penalty which will include all three offences before us.”If the offence before us had not been racially aggravated, then the number of hours would have been 100.”You will also pay compensation to each of the officers to the value of £100.”Sentencing White to an 18-month community order, Ms Townsend said: “You assaulted a police officer in the execution of his duty, which is serious enough for a community order.”Holland was given a £323 fine for obstructing a police officer, a £107 fine for being drunk and disorderly and order to pay £85 costs and a £32 victim surcharge.White was also ordered to perform 100 hours of unpaid work, ordered to pay £150 compensation to PC Kouda, as well as £85 court costs and a £115 victim surcharge.McLaughlin must also attend a 15-day rehabilitation requirement activity and pay £100 compensation to the two police officers, £85 costs and a £115 victim surcharge.He was handed a 12-month community order in October at the same court after he admitted theft.McLaughlin and two other guardsmen had convinced Matthew Massey to lend them his bank card and reveal his PIN number so they could nip out of Wellington Barracks.The trio then got a cab to Sophisticats and ran up a £4,656.10 bill as they spent hours boozing and admiring scantily-clad dancers at the gentleman’s club in Marylebone Lane.McLaughlin told his sergeant major he could not remember what happened but later claimed to be “disgusted” when he was shown CCTV footage from the night.  When PC Andrew Fletcher tried to speak to the soldiers moments later McLaughlin called him an “American —” and began squaring up to him while White tried to hold him back.PC Fletcher said in a statement: “He continued to call me a —- and said he would take me down if I tried to do anything, he then said he would destroy me.””He said that I was a skinny white —-, said he would “drop me” and spat at me.”When his colleague tried to intervene, White got PC Owura Kodua in a choke hold.It took both officers to arrest White and restrain him while he kicked out and spat at them.Jersey-born McLaughlin then called PC Kodua a “black —-” while he was being handcuffed.When Holland was arrested he screamed “All for one and one for all”.All three soldiers were based at Wellington Barracks, just 300 yards from Buckingham Palace, but McLaughlin has since terminated his service, Westminster Magistrates Court heard.McLaughlin was spared jail in October for spending £4,500 binging on champagne and buying private dances at a strip club with another soldier’s debit card. PC Kodua said in a statement read to the court: “I’ve been assaulted during my seven years as a police officer, but this incident was the worst and the most frightening.”Being grabbed around the throat whilst I am trying to do my job is not something you should be subjected to – I couldn’t breath​e​ and had I not broken free it would have caused injury to my neck.”I was then subject to racist abuse.”PC Fletcher said: “I have been a police officer for seven years, I’ve got a good working relationship with the community including the Wellington Barracks and I have never been subjected to such hateful abuse before.”This is making me think extremely hard about patrolling Leicester Square – I’ve never been targeted with such conviction as Mr McLoughlin showed.”No one should be subjected to this sort of behaviour regardless of their skin colour or nationality.”Holland admitted being drunk and disorderly and obstructing a constable in the execution of their duty.White admitted assaulting a constable in the execution of their duty.McLaughlin admitted two counts of racially aggravated harassment. Thomas McLaughlin Credit:Central  Thomas McLaughlin  Tom McLaughlin and Oliver White Credit:Central  Tom McLaughlin and Oliver White  John Greany, defending McLaughlin, said: “He was with two young friends, out on the town, drinking too much away from his military barracks and it all gets out of hand.”Mr McLaughlin himself was trying to calm others down, but obviously he disgraces himself thereafter.”He is deeply ashamed of what he has done and he said as much in his interview.”McLaughlin has a previous conviction for assault as a 15-year-old as well as the recent theft matter.Mr Greany added that McLaughlin had since left the Army, was looking for work while living with his father in Jersey and now intends to reapply to serve in two years.Amiz Ahmaz, representing both White and Holland, said: “It is clear that, had it not been for the behaviour of Mr McLaughlin, Mr White and Mr Holland would not necessarily have been involved.”Mr McLaughlin was the main player in the abuse.”It is also clear Mr White was initially the peace maker. He tried to steer Mr McLaughlin from trouble.”But Mr White does accept he put PC Kodua in a headlock. His understanding of what was going is that Mr McLaughlin was on the floor with his face in a puddle.”Mr Holland accepts verbally abusing people and shouting expletives, but he was not really part of what was going on.”He actually walks away, but comes back some 20 minutes later because he has friends who are still in the club. He is refused entry and it is at that point he is arrested.” I have never been subjected to such hateful abuse beforePc Fletcher A Queen’s Guardsman gabbed a police officer around the throat while another soldier shouted racist abuse at him after they were kicked out of a nightclub, a court heard.Oliver White, 21, put PC Owura Kodua in a choke-hold, while Thomas McLaughlin, also 21, shouted “black —-” at the officer, Westminster Magistrates Court heard. McLaughlin and White, along with 19-year-old Paul Holland were all serving for the elite regiment at Wellington Barracks when they were kicked out of Zoo Bar in Leicester Square.They were ejected for hurling abuse at a group of American tourists and insulting the US Army, prompting door staff to call the police on August 2. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Antibacterial wipes pointless as bugs grow back in 20 minutes scientist says

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “The point of the show is you don’t need to be so fastidious in cleaning your house from top to bottom because you can’t actually remove all bacteria and nor would we want to – exposing ourselves to everyday pathogens is good in keeping the immune system healthy and strong.”The research shows you can quite quickly reestablish bacteria that we have in our homes anyway. You’re never going to get your home sterile and clean – no way – and there are better things to be doing with your time.She added: “Spend your time cleaning up after food that’s known to be high risk. But on a Sunday, if your kitchen is clean, don’t be cracking out the antibacterials and wiping it down because it’s an absolutely redundant exercise – the minute you walk around the kitchen you’re shedding bacteria and fungi into the area again and it’s just recolonising.””Personally I don’t waste my time purchasing antibacterial products for the home… Our research found that a lot of antibacterial cleaning products were not as effective as good old fashioned soap and water.” But keeping kitchen work surfaces germ-free was impossible because they are found throughout the home and therefore rapidly repopulate, she said.”Some bacteria can divide every 20 minutes so it doesn’t take long for one cell to become one million cells – in fact it would only take around 6.6 hours,” Dr Lanyon told The Telegraph. Anti-bacterial wipes only eradicate bacteria from kitchen surfaces for 20 minutes and using them to keep germs at bay is “an absolutely redundant” exercise, a scientist has said. Dr Clare Lanyon, a biomedical scientist from Northumbria University in Newcastle upon Tyne, said consumers may be wasting money on antibacterial wipes and sprays because common germs, which can replicate themselves in just 20 minutes, quickly recolonise back to original mass even if just one single cell is left over. She said bar soap was found to be more effective at destroying bacteria because they tended to contain ingredients that broke down cell walls.Dr Lanyon was speaking to The Telegraph after conducting an experiment for the BBC programme, Trust Me I’m A Doctor, which found “dramatic growth” of microbes within 12 hours of cleaning of a regular kitchen surface with wipes.She said it was always important to clean up thoroughly after handling raw meat to minimise the risk of harmful “foreign organisms” spreading but that this was most effectively done by scrubbing with soap. If your kitchen is clean, don’t be cracking out the antibacterials and wiping it down because it’s an absolutely redundant exerciseDr Clare Lanyonlast_img read more

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Column Children need a change from the old HSE way of thinking

first_imgLAST NOVEMBER, IRISH voters made a decision to strength children’s rights in the Irish constitution. This decision, one of the most significant made since the founding of the State, indicates Irish society’s changed perspective on children and on how we wish to look after our children in the future.The passing of the Children’s Rights Constitutional Referendum is only the beginning. If and when the referendum result becomes law, it will require the restructuring of all services interfacing with children and a major cultural shift in how we view and interact with children. In this context, the development of the new Child and Family Support Agency – which will be one of the largest public bodies in the State with more than 4,000 employees and a budget of over €550 million – provides us with a unique opportunity to commence this cultural change by creating a truly children’s rights based, child-centred organisation.Alternative to old systemThis new agency is being formed as an alternative to the old HSE’s Children and Family Services. It is envisaged that by creating an independent agency, children’s rights, child protection, child welfare and family support will be given additional priority and resources. Within the vastness of the old HSE structures, child protection and children’s rights were not prioritised, a fact admitted by Brendan Drumm when he was departing as CEO of the organisation.However, the creation of the new agency needs to be done carefully and strategically. There is a risk that the practices and culture of the HSE will transfer across to this new agency, particularly given that almost all of the staff who will be working in the new agency are currently working within the HSE.Achieving a cultural shift will require a number of difference components. It will firstly require ensuring that the principles of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child form the fundamental principles of the new agency. Secondly, it will require putting children at the centre of all programming, planning and structure, and thirdly it will require engaging children themselves in all aspects of the work so that child participation becomes a key activity and component of this organisation and children have a real say in shaping the services being established for them.Empowerment and protectionA central component to creating this culture will be obtaining a balance between empowerment and protection. The concept of evolving approaches whereby it is recognised that children in different environments and cultures with different life experiences will acquire competencies at different ages is central, as is ensuring that as much emphasis is placed on providing prevention and support services as is on providing child protection services.Building a children’s rights based organisation will require a significant shift in mindset for professionals working within the new agency. These professionals are coming from an organisation where the main focus has been on responding to emergencies and emerging scandals, an environment not conducive to a children’s rights focus. For these professionals, this is an opportunity to work in an organisation that is true to the ethos of how they were trained and is in line with international best practice.Positive and lasting changeKnowing that adopting a children’s rights based approach is the most effective way to bring about positive and lasting change for children, their families and communities, they will want to grasp the opportunity to create an organisation that is founded on children’s rights based principles. They will need to be supported in this by Government, management and all those voluntary agencies working with children.Through the development of the new Child and Family Support Agency, the first steps towards realising the true potential of the children’s constitutional amendment can be taken. By taking this opportunity, we can begin to redress some of the ways that Irish society has failed children in the past and it is an opportunity that those working in this new agency and those seeking to support this new agency will want to grasp with energy and enthusiasm. Grounding the new agency in a children’s rights ethos is not only the best way forward but is indeed, as of last November, a Constitutional requirement.Paul Gilligan is the present Chair of the Children’s Rights Alliance and he is also the Chief Executive of St Patrick’s University Hospital.last_img read more

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Adobe breaks 1B in revenue despite the demise of Flash

first_imgIf you read Geek regularly, you know this has not been a particularly good year for Adobe, at least as far as PR is concerned. The year pretty much started with Steve Jobs declaring Flash to be a bane on computers everywhere, and it got worse from there: not only did smartphones and tablets (which don’t run Flash well, or at all) become the de rigeur devices of 2010, but device cross-compatible HTML5 has increasingly eaten away at Flash’s dominance when it comes to interactive content.In short, 2010 saw Flash Player transition from a thriving Adobe product to one that is on the way to being in its death throes. You might think, then, that Adobe didn’t have a particularly good financial year… but not so! Instead, Adobe had their best year ever.How well is Adobe doing? Gangbusters. This was the first year they pulled in over $1 billion in revenue, up over 33% over last year’s $757 million.To put this all in perspective, last year, Adobe posted a loss of $32 million, while this quarter alone, they earned $269 million.The secret to Adobe’s success? Basically every other product besides Flash. What an interesting year: not only did 2010 prove to most computer users that they can live without Flash, it even proved the same to Adobe, who had their best year ever even as Flash died.Read more at USA Todaylast_img read more

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Firefox 10 est disponible et apporte des fonctions de recherche

first_imgFirefox 10 est disponible et apporte des fonctions de recherche La nouvelle version de Firefox, numérotée 10, est disponible depuis ce 2 février. Parmi les nouveautés, des fonctions de recherches plus pratiques, une comptabilité des extensions revue à la hausse et moins de bugs. En même temps d’ailleurs que la version 10 du client de messagerie Thunderbird.Seulement six semaines s’étaient écoulées depuis la version 9 de Firefox. Son éditeur, Mozilla, a en effet accéléré ses cycles de développement, pour rester à niveau avec la concurrence (en neuf mois, le logiciel est passé de la version 4 à la version 10).Sont nouvelles : des fonctionnalités pour les développeurs (les outils Page Inspector et DBI, le support de l’Anti-Aliasing pour WebGL, et une meilleure prise en charge du CSS), mais aussi un système de gestion des extensions amélioré (qui réglera les problèmes de compatibilité des plug-ins avec les différentes versions du navigateur, supposant par défaut qu’elles sont compatibles), une meilleure prise en charge de l’API Plein Écran pour les applications Web et la disparition du bouton « Suivant », à moins que le bouton « Précédent » n’ait été utilisé.  Notons que Flash est absent, Adobe ayant arrêté tout développement de ce côté. Firefox 10 est aussi la première édition ESR (Extended Support Release – à support étendu), facilitant le déploiement et la gestion du navigateur en entreprise. Des versions Mac et PC sont disponibles, mais également Android. L’édition mobile de Firefox renforce la prise en charge du multipoint directement sur les pages web en se basant sur les recommandations W3C Touch Events. Firefox 10 sera installé sous la forme d’une mise à jour silencieuse pour les internautes utilisant déjà le navigateur.Ce n’est pas fini, puisque dès ce 27 février une nouvelle mouture, destinée à être plus rapide sous Android, sera présentée au Mobile World Congress de Barcelone.Le 2 février 2012 à 19:30 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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RideHailing App Vehicles Abandoned in China

first_img U.S. Army To Test Remote-Controlled Combat VehiclesDomino’s Brings Autonomous Pizza Delivery to Houston Stay on target Is this where good cars go to die? As China’s ride-hailing apps and companies grapple with a safety crisis and slowing growth, photos emerge of more than a thousand vehicles abandoned in an industrial park, most of them still new.The abandoned vehicles are located in Nanjing, in the Jiangsu province of China.View of abandoned ride-hailing app vehicles in Nanjing, China on November 1, 2018. (Photo Credit: VCG/VCG via Getty Images)Earlier this year, Nanjing became the first city in China to put a temporary cap on the number of vehicles that can be hailed online and via apps, as reported by Jiemian (in Chinese). By controlling the issuance of new licenses for ride-hailing vehicles and taxis, the city was hoping to regulate the sector, curb illegal practices, and reduce safety risks.In September, Meituan Dianping, operator of the world’s largest on-demand food delivery service, announced that it was halting further expansion into China’s ride-hailing market. The Beijing-based company started its pilot ride-hailing operations in Shanghai and Nanjing earlier this year, and was expected to compete with the country’s industry leader, Didi Chuxing.The change in strategy for Meituan came after the deaths of two young women passengers on Didi’s carpool-like Hitch service within the space of three months, according to the South China Morning Post.The deaths also prompted China to conduct comprehensive inspections on all ride-haling service companies, according to Reuters. The inspections started in September.Abandoned ride-hailing app vehicles in Nanjing, China on October 31, 2018. (Photo Credit: VCG/VCG via Getty Images)Even with the crises the, ride-hailing industry in China is already worth $30 billion, more than the rest of the world combined, according to a report from consulting firm Bain & Company released in May this year. And it could more than double in size to reach $72 billion by 2020.But fierce competition — aside from big players Didi and Meituan Dianping, third-party apps such as WeChat and Alipay offer ride-hailing services — is likely to allow only a small number of companies to survive.“We’re seeing a lot of acquisition and consolidation,” Raymond Tsang, one of the authors of the Bain & Company report, told CNN Business. “And profitability among these players has not been very high, to say the least.”More on Geek.com:Uber, Lyft Help Voters Get to the Polls on Election DayWaymo, GM Lead Self-Driving Car RaceToyota’s e-Palette Mobile Retail Space Expected in 2020last_img read more

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Real Madrid legend Ronaldo exit would hurt

first_imgReal Madrid legend Michel Salgado has admitted that Cristiano Ronaldo’s departure this summer will “hurt” him and he also conceded that the lowering of the release clause has left him “worried”The five-time Ballon d’Or winner has been linked with a sensational €100m move to Juventus this summer with the latest reports suggesting that a deal is close to being completed.Salgado, who left Real at the same time as Ronaldo arrived for a then-world record transfer fee of €94m from Manchester United in 2009, is troubled by the fact that the 33-year-old may very well be on his way out.“Personally, if he is going, it will hurt me because I have been with him for six months,” said Salgado, according to SportsKeeda.Franck Ribery, FiorentinaFiorentina owner: “Ribery played better than Ronaldo!” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Fiorentina owner Rocco Commisso was left gushing over Franck Ribery’s performance against Juventus, which he rates above that of even Cristiano Ronaldo’s.“He was leaving his mark in Real Madrid or he is still doing it, but I know him pretty much, and when he takes a decision he goes ahead no matter the consequences.“But, if Cristiano is not going, we will have him for the biggest moments because he is a phenomenon. But if he finally decides to go, we have to wish him all the best and thank him for everything.“I am worried that he is going but that is a personal decision and lowering the release clause worried me as well.”Salgado spent 10 years of his playing career at Real between 1999 and 2009, where he won four La Liga titles and two Champions League crowns in that period.last_img read more

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Robbery suspect sought by police

first_imgClark County sheriff’s deputies are looking for a man in connection with a home invasion robbery in Hazel Dell on Friday night.Sgt. Tony Barnes said the robbery was in the 100 block of Northeast 83rd St., not far from the JM Plaza Safeway store.The robber was described as a white man, 5-feet, 10-inches, 180 pounds, wearing a dark hoody sweatshirt.The man robbed a couple of a few dollars as they arrived home in their car. A shot was fired but no one was hurt, authorities said.last_img

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Layoff RoundUp Entrepreneur Forbes More …

first_imgIt’s a battlefield out there. Yesterday, b-to-b publisher Cygnus Business Media laid off 30 staffers, or about 6 percent of its workforce, and suspended publication of two photography titles.In terms of layoff/cutback stories, that was just the tip of the iceberg.Rumors surfaced late Tuesday about massive editorial layoffs at Irvine, California-based Entrepreneur Media. Two FOLIO: requests for comment have gone unanswered, but a knowledgeable source tells me that eight editorial staffers—including executive editor Charlotte Jensen and managing editor Mike Werling—have been cut. If that’s true, a quick count of editorial names on the masthead indicates that 15 print and online editorial employees remain—including a copy editor, a research editor, a listings assistant and two interns. There aren’t many people left to write the magazine. There also have been rumors that Forbes Media has started a second round of layoffs, this time letting go more than 50 people. My e-mail about the cuts was bounced from spokesperson to spokesperson and I never received an official response. Forbes announced a restructuring in November that resulted in 43 layoffs.The rumors hit b-to-b publishing, too. Sources told me today that Milo Media—which saw six staffers, including several publishers, walk out last week to form their own, competing publishing company—has closed down altogether. Phone calls and e-mails to president Mike Domke have not been returned.I also received a tip that Randolph, New Jersey-based Edgell Communications slashed employee salaries by 10 percent company-wide. That, it turns out, was true. “As consistent with Edgell’s operating philosophy, particularly over this recent downturn, the salary reduction was a proactive decision based on the high degree of uncertainty in the market,” a spokesperson wrote in an e-mail. “Our revenue forecasting—even over several months—has become increasingly unreliable.” Edgell, which reorganized late last year, said no layoffs were associated with the salary cuts.Even as I’m writing this, I’ve stumbled upon more rumors of layoffs and closings.It’s a tough time to be in magazine publishing. Sometimes it seems all you can do is put on your helmet and let the shrapnel fall.last_img read more

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Alexa speakers can now talk to Roku streamers and TVs

first_img $229 3:20 Amazon Echo Show Review • The Amazon Echo Show is back and better than before Roku’s streamers and TVs also work with Google Home speakers as of last year. They work in pretty much the same way as this Alexa skill. Netflix isn’t supported in either case, and you need to append “Roku” to the command to get it to work. Roku also has its own voice system, which you can use by speaking into compatible Roku remote controls or via Roku’s phone app.Amazon’s Fire TV streamers and televisions, which compete directly against Roku, also work with Alexa speakers. That combination does support Netflix and does not require any extra trigger words. Check out our full Roku vs. Amazon Fire TV comparison for details.To use the new Alexa skill with your Roku, head to the Alexa app on your phone and turn it on it under Settings > TV & Video. Mentioned Above Amazon Echo Show Second Generation (Sandstone) Dell CNET may get a commission from retail offers. $229 Which Roku player should you buy? See it $229 Comment See It Preview • Amazon gives Echo Show sequel sleeker looks and better soundcenter_img Crutchfield Media Streamers Best Buy News • Grab a 1st-gen Amazon Echo Show for $70 Tags $229 Now playing: Watch this: Alexa Amazon Google Roku 1 See It Share your voice See It David Katzmaier/CNET If you have both an Amazon Echo and a Roku in the house, get ready to start talking to the TV.The new Roku skill, available now, lets Alexa speakers such as the Echo, Echo Dot, Echo Show and others accept your voice commands to control Roku streamers and TVs.You can now use Alexa to:Launch Apps (“Alexa, open Hulu on Roku”)Control playback (“Alexa, pause Roku”)Search (“Alexa, find dramas on Roku”)Roku TV owners get additional capabilities, including power (“Alexa, turn on Roku”), volume and mute, input switching and channel changing (with an over-th-air antenna).The big exception? Netflix. The most popular subscription streaming video service in the world doesn’t accept Alexa commands to Roku devices.Hands-free voice control is an increasingly popular alternative to the good old remote control, and numerous smart TVs already have Alexa skills. It’s a lot easier to use many of the features by voice. Asking Alexa to find a particular TV show or movie is far easier than typing into a cumbersome on-screen keyboard, for example.last_img read more

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Humayun Ahmeds 7th death anniv being observed

first_imgHumayun Ahmed. Prothom Alo File PhotoThe seventh death anniversary of celebrated playwright, writer and filmmaker Humayun Ahmed is being observed on Friday, reports UNB.Family of the prominent writer and his fans are observing the day with various programmes including offering special prayers at the writer’s graveyard at Nuhash Palli and holding milad and doa mahfil.Different television channels will air various programmes highlighting the life and works of the wordsmith.Humayun Ahmed was born in Netrakona’s Mohanganj to Foyzur Rahman Ahmed and Ayesha Foyez on 13 November 1948.The writer died of cancer at a hospital in New York on 19 July 2012.His breakthrough was his debut novel Nondito Noroke published in 1972.He wrote over 200 fiction and non-fiction books, most of them were bestsellers in Bangladesh.Humayun Ahmed won Ekushey Padak, Bangla Academy Award, Lekhak Shibir Award and Michael Madhusudan Padak for his outstanding contributions to the Bangla literature.In the early 1990s, Ahmed emerged as a filmmaker. He went on to make a total of eight films – each based on his own novels.He received six Bangladesh National Film Awards in different categories for the films Daruchini Dwip, Aguner Poroshmoni and Ghetuputra Komola.Ahmed is often credited with revitalising Bengali literature. His unique storytelling style captures the oral tradition and rhythm at the root of Bangla, bringing to life the stories and aspirations of traditional middle class and rural families.last_img read more

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New Research From Psychological Science

first_imgWhen the Muses Strike: Creative Ideas of Physicists and Writers Routinely Occur During Mind WanderingShelly L. Gable, Elizabeth A. Hopper, and Jonathan W. Schooler Conceptually Rich, Perceptually Sparse: Object Representations in 6-Month-Old Infants’ Working MemoryMelissa M. Kibbe and Alan M. Leslie Read about the latest research published in Psychological Science: A Tight Spot: How Personality Moderates the Impact of Social Norms on Sojourner AdaptationNicolas Geeraert, Ren Li, Colleen Ward, Michele Gelfand, and Kali A. Demes How do contextual factors and personality traits affect how individuals adapt to a new culture when they temporarily move to a different country? To answer this question, Geeraert and colleagues analyzed data from a longitudinal acculturation project that measured young adults’ personality and cultural adaptation during and after a temporary move to a different country. These measures were collected on three occasions: 3 months before departure as well as 2 weeks and 5 months after arrival to the host country. Overall, participants who moved to a tight culture (i.e., one with strong norms and little tolerance for deviance) showed less adaptation than those who moved to a loose culture (i.e., one with less rigid norms), but participants originally from a tight culture showed more adaptation than those from a loose culture. Participants who scored higher on agreeableness and honesty-humility were less likely to feel the negative effects of cultural tightness or to return early to their home country. These results may help ensure a good fit between individuals’ personalities and their destination culture, which will increase the benefits of the rapid increase in international mobility. Do infants remember conceptual information about an object (e.g., the object is a ball) even when they do not remember perceptual information (e.g., the object is round and green)? This study indicates that they do. Six-month-old infants were familiarized with a yellow and red striped ball and a doll’s head with brown skin and eyes. The two objects were then hidden one at a time in separate locations. One of the objects then reappeared at the location where the first object was hidden; critically, this object could be the same one that had been hidden there or the other object. The experimenters measured the time that infants spent looking at this object. Infants looked longer when the object had been swapped, indicating that they remembered the hidden object’s conceptual information. This effect did not occur when the doll’s head was inverted and therefore not processed as a face. It also did not occur when the ball was swapped for a green ball with red polka dots or when the doll’s head was swapped for a doll’s head with pink skin and blue eyes, indicating that infants’ memory for the first object hidden relied on conceptual details (e.g., is the object a ball or a head?) but not on perceptual details (e.g., does the object have brown or blue eyes?). These results suggest that infants may encode the conceptual category of a hidden object, even when perceptual features are lost. Mind wandering, which involves thoughts that are both independent from the task at hand and different from one’s previous thoughts on the matter, can generate creative ideas experienced as “aha” moments, this study suggests. Every day for 1 or 2 weeks, physicists and writers listed their most important creative idea of the day, described what they were thinking and doing when the idea occurred, and rated the importance of the idea and whether it felt like an “aha” moment or not. Participants reported that about 20% of their most important ideas occurred when their minds were wandering, and these ideas were rated as being equally important and creative as the ideas formed while working on task. After 3 or 6 months, they rated all these previous ideas as slightly more creative but less important. Overall, ideas generated during mind wandering were more likely to be rated as “aha” moments, compared with ideas generated while working. Hence, profession-related ideas that occur outside of work when people are not thinking about the topic can be inventive and create sudden insights, showing a positive side of mind wandering.last_img read more

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KMC starts antidengue drive in S Kolkata

first_imgKolkata: The Kolkata Municipal Corporation carried out a special drive to combat dengue in ward 69 in south Kolkata on Friday.Sukhdeb Chakraborty, local Trinamool Congress councillor along with senior civic officials of Health, Building and Soil Waste Management (SWM) departments were present during the drive. The KMC teams visited houses on Beltola Road and Ballygunge Circular Road where people who had dengue in 2018 are residing. The teams talked to the residents and requested them to follow the dos and don’ts suggested by the Kolkata Municipal Corporation. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseThe teams examined the overhead tanks and underground reservoirs and visited the terrace of some houses. The senior officials urged the owners of the houses where garbage was found in the terrace to clear them immediately. “The house owners fail to understand that even an used plastic cup that contains water can serve as a potential mosquito breeding ground,” senior officials said. The drive had tremendous impact on the area as the residents lauded the effort of the Kolkata Municipal Corporation to reduce the number of dengue cases. Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee has instructed all civic bodies to take steps to control dengue in their respective areas. She had presided over a high-level meeting in Nabanna where she instructed the senior state government officials to ensure that the water at the metro rail construction sites are cleaned as stagnate water may serve as a major mosquito breeding ground. As a follow up mayor Firhad Hakim held a meeting at the KMC headquarters on Wednesday. Senior officials of the central and state government establishments were present at the meeting. The KMC will conduct anti-larvae drive in three phases. The ongoing phase will continue till June while the second phase will start in July and continue till October while the follow up phase will be November and December.last_img read more

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Watch Exclusive interview with Drakensberg Boys Choir School staff at Music in

first_imgThe Drakensberg Boys’ Choir are currently hosting their annual ‘Music in the Mountains’ festival.The proceedings started on Friday (April 27) and finish today (April 30), ending off with a dinner tonight.‘Music in the Mountains’ sees people from all over the country and even abroad attending, with between 5000 and 6000 festival-goers in attendance this year.The Drakensberg Boys’ Choir played host to visiting schools from all over the country, as well as leading artists.The Old Boys also played a key part in the proceedings over the weekend, even having a production of their own.Saturday night saw a packed auditorium coming to watch a tribute to Leonard Bernstein, who was an American composer, conductor, author, music lecturer and pianist. He was among the first conductors born and educated in the US to receive worldwide acclaim.The Drakensberg Boys’ Choir is world renowned and have travelled around the globe. Here are just some of the countries they have performed in: Netherlands, Austria, South Korea, Italy and Germany.Also read: 50 years of being ambassadors near Ladysmith Also read: Choir boys come first in Mudman FinalA journalist from the Ladysmith Gazette attended the event and got to interview some amazing key members of the Drakensberg Boys’ Choir.Executive Head – Greg Brooks and Artistic Director – Bernard Kruger took time out from their busy schedules to talk to the Gazette and this is what they had to say during their video interview about the weekend’s proceedings.Click to receive news links via WhatsApp. Or  for the latest news, visit our webpage or follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Join us there! WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite last_img read more

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Highlights of the NCoBC 2015 Conference Survivorship

first_img Recent Videos View all 606 items Videos | Breast Imaging | March 24, 2015 Highlights of the NCoBC 2015 Conference: Survivorship CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports View all 9 items Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:15Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:15 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Barbara Rabinowitz, Ph.D., MSW, RN, founder of the National Consortium of Breast Centers, talks with ITN editorial director Melinda Taschetta-Millane during NCoBC’s 25th anniversary conference, and addresses the very important topic of survivorship. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Find more SCCT news and videos FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Molecular Imaging View all 22 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items center_img Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Women’s Health View all 62 items Find more SCCT news and videos Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Information Technology View all 220 items Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

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