Guyana employs UK’s ‘think tank’ to explore feasibility of oil refinery

first_imgAs Guyana prepares for oil production, Government has recruited United Kingdom’s think tank – Chatham House – to conduct a study on the feasibility of establishing an oil refinery here.This was announced by Natural Resources Minister Raphael Trotman, explained to reporters on Friday that the issue of the refinery is not an easy question to answer with just “a yes or no.”“We have sought assistance in giving us guidance as to whether Guyana needs an oil refinery, bearing in mind we have one find of oil so far. Our demand is by all standards low because we are less than a million people,” he stated.According to Trotman, the country has committed to go into renewable energy within 10 years and therefore, it has to forecast where the economy is likely to be in terms of its dependence on hydro carbons or petroleum. This, he noted, will inform whether or not and to what extent Guyana will get into the business of oil refinery.“So indeed, I don’t believe that the pronouncement that we shall not have is the right pronouncement and neither is a pronouncement that says we shall have so right now we have commissioned a study. I hope and expect before the end of the year, Government will be guided from an economic standpoint whether or not we should have a refinery, whether or not government should have a stake in such a venture or whether it should be left to the private sector on its own,” he outlined.Even as Government awaits the findings from the study, the Natural Resources Minister pointed out that Guyana has to be recognizant of situations that prevailed in other territories. He noted that other countries where the governments got involved in the refineries, such as Suriname, are now struggling because the prices have gone down drastically and they are left with more or less a “white elephant”.Chatham House is part of a new producer’s group, which is a group of countries that are going into new producers, literally, to provide expertise to do the review as to whether or not the benefit in having a refinery.ExxonMobil recently discovered that the second exploration well in the Stabroek Block offshore Guyana has a recoverable resource of between 800 million and 1.4 billion oil-equivalent barrels. The wells are located approximately 193 kilometres (120 miles) offshore. The block is 26,800 square kilometres (6.6 million acres).Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Limited holds 45 per cent interest in the Stabroek Block; Hess Guyana Exploration Ltd holds 30 per cent interest and CNOOC Nexen Petroleum Guyana Limited holds 25 per cent interest.ExxonMobil is the largest refiner and marketer of petroleum products while its chemical company is one of the largests in the world.In a previous interview with Guyana Times, Associate Professor and political activist David Hinds implored Government to develop a long-term plan to manage its oil resource. In fact, he urged that Guyana should develop its own oil refinery while adding that if it cannot do so on its own, then the country should partner with Caricom countries to construct one.“That is the way to go…that is why we have Caricom… It would be nice if we can have our own oil processing here but if we cannot do it by ourselves then we can partner with sister Caricom countries to do,” he said, explaining that this is what a single market is about.He noted that if Guyana and Trinidad could develop an arrangement where they can both manage a future oil refinery in Guyana, then both Guyanese residing in Trinidad and Guyana would benefit.“It is either we have our own processing plant or we do it through a regional emphasis,” Hinds stressed.last_img read more

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Begovic on Stoke, Bosnia and stopping Lionel Messi

first_imgStoke goalkeeper Asmir Begovic joined Mark Saggers on World Cup Kick Off to discuss a variety of topics, including his thoughts on the final between Germany and Argentina.The Bosnia star was between the sticks for the Group F opening game against La Albiceleste, which his country eventually lost 2-1 after putting up a good fight.And Begovic offered his thoughts on how Germany can prepare to stop Barcelona star, Lionel Messi, who scored against the World Cup debutants that night in Rio de Janerio.The 27-year-old also discusses what it was like to play at a World Cup for a first time and chats about pre-season training with Stoke ahead of the Premier League season.The World Cup final between Germany and Argentina is live on talkSPORT from 8pm on Sunday. Click here for ways to listen.last_img read more

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VACANCIES: NEW COFFEE HOUSE AND WINE BAR SEEKS EXPERIENCED COUNTER STAFF

first_imgA brand new coffee house and wine bar in the heart of Letterkenny is looking to recruit new staff.Berry Layne is looking to recruit experienced counter assistants before their opening which will be very soon.Only applicants with relevant experience will be considered. Please read all the details above and send a cover letter and CV to hr@berrylayne.comA brand new job awaits you at what promises to be one of Donegal’s finest restaurants. VACANCIES: NEW COFFEE HOUSE AND WINE BAR SEEKS EXPERIENCED COUNTER STAFF was last modified: April 3rd, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Berry Laynecoffee houseletterkennyStaffWine Barlast_img read more

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Mulroy Estate Harvest Fair to get under way this weekend!

first_imgThe Mulroy Estate Harvest Fair will kick off this Saturday in Carrigart at 1pm. It’s only €5 per person and all proceeds will be donated to a local charity. Last year they donated to the Fire Brigade!There will be corn cutting, ploughing, ponies and traps, bouncy castles, a funfair, face painting and much more! For more information call Belinda on 085 8406146, or Martin on 089 4884432. Mulroy Estate Harvest Fair to get under way this weekend! was last modified: August 25th, 2016 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:charityharvest fairmulroy estatelast_img read more

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MAN PLEADS GUILTY TO DANGEROUS DRIVING CAUSING DEATH

first_imgA 26 year old Newtowncunningham man has pleaded guilty dangerous driving causing the death of another man.Eunan McBrearty, of 58 Woodthorp, Newtowncunningham, appeared at Letterkenny Circuit Court yesterday in connection with the death of Bobby Rodgers.He pleaded guilty to the charge which was connected to an incident in Murlog, Lifford on May 6th, 2012. The court was told that McBrearty had numerous previous convictions for relatively minor matters.Garda Sgt Jim Collins told the court that Gardai had no objection to McBrearty being released on bail.Judge Francis Comerford asked how will a requested probation report would benefit the court.He was told that it would help the court set a more appropriate sentence when it heard of McBrearty’s background.Judge Comerford agreed to a probation report, adjourned the case  and released McBrearty on his own bond of €500.MAN PLEADS GUILTY TO DANGEROUS DRIVING CAUSING DEATH was last modified: May 7th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Bobby rodgerscourtdangerous driving causing deathdonegalGardaiHunan McBreartyLiffordlast_img read more

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Another Flap Over Dinosaur Feathers

first_img(Visited 46 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The first North American “feathered dinosaur” has put the media in a frenzy of celebration over questionable data.Three Canadians from Alberta took a look at old fossils of the “ostrich-mimic” dinosaur Ornithomimus stored in drawers at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, and found fibrous impressions in the sandstone they interpret as feathers on the forewings.  News media immediately launched an artwork-laden campaign of touting this as the first “feathered dinosaur” found outside of China and Germany (Archaeopteryx being the German claim).As soon as the paper hit Science, as if on cue, Science Daily, PhysOrg, Live Science, the BBC News and the other usual suspects put up Julius Csotonyi’s creative artwork from their paper in their coverage with no critique or alternative analysis whatsoever.  Strangely, the popular reports added colorful backgrounds of sky and forest that were not present in the small image in the paper, though the University of Calgary press release came fully illustrated.  Moreover, the popular reports simply parroted the interpretation of the feathers as courtship displays, while soft-pedaling the problems.And there are problems.  First of all, the rock impressions of the “feathers” consist mostly of straight lines that look nothing like the pennaceous flight feathers of Archaeopteryx.  One will read Zelenitsky’s paper in vain for mention the words vane, pennaceous or barbule in the main paper or supplemental information, except (for barbule) in the following curious circumlocution, “Evidence of shafted feathers {i.e., feathers with a rigid shaft, with or without interlocking barbules [type 3 feathers or higher (11, 12)]} is preserved on the forelimb bones of an adult Ornithomimus skeleton.”  The authors call them “filamentous feathers” with filamentous meaning just that: a filament or shaft, much simpler than the complex vanes of true feathers with their barbs, barbules and interlocking hooks.So do the photos of the fossils show these to be true feathers?  No; even the interpretive sketches show nothing but straight lines, with the exception of a very few tiny fragments shaped like a U or curve that, with copious imagination, might be interpreted as hooks for something, though they are disconnected from any barbs or barbules, which are not evident anywhere.  Further, these “feathers” are not connected to the skeleton, being separated by a centimeter or more at various angles from parallel to almost perpendicular.  They look like scratches in the rock.  Since the fossils were buried in sandstone instead of the limestone of German and Chinese fossils, license has to be taken to assume that such delicate impressions could be made in sandstone in this singular instance.  The authors tempted other researchers to go on a search for feathers in sandstone.Other problems present themselves with the “feathered dinosaur” interpretation.  All the others were theropods in the group of saurischian (lizard-hipped) dinosaurs.  This one is completely outside that group.  It’s in the ornithischian (bird-hipped) branch.  While that might sound like a plus for dinosaur-to-bird evolution theories, it would require evolutionists to postulate the emergence of the feather-whatever-things in the common ancestor long before flight supposedly evolved.  These feathers had nothing to do with the evolution of  flight.  The creatures were far too heavy for that.  The authors admit this by postulating that the “filamentous feathers” (found only on the adult) were used for courtship display.There was only one adult that showed the scratch marks, and one juvenile without them.  A third had markings on the bone.  Notice how their handling of the specimens adds to the confusion:Preparation of specimens with feathersTwo ornithomimosaur skeletons associated with fossilized feathers, TMP 2008.70.1 and TMP 2009.110.1, were preserved in hard, cemented sandstone blocks and prepared in 2008-2009. Preparation of this matrix could only be achieved with a Chicago Pneumatic (CP-9361) airscribe. In order to expose the feathers preserved in TMP 2008.70.1, the rock had to break along the parting plane on which the structures are preserved. In many instances, the rock did not break along that plane, resulting in the partial destruction of some filaments. In TMP 2009.110.1, the parting plane fortunately occurred between the sandstone and the ferruginous coating, revealing the presence of filamentous feathers in the ironstone.A third skeleton (TMP 1995.110.1) was preserved in a siltstone to fine-grained sandstone and displays markings on the left radius and ulna, inferred to be traces left by shafted feathers.  Although the markings were first discovered on the bones during specimen preparation in 1995, feathers impressions were not found in the matrix at the time.  (Supplemental Information, p. 2).The photo of 1995.110.1 shows only dark criss-cross markings on the bone that they “inferred to be traces left by shafted feathers.”  They don’t bear any resemblance to actual feathers.  This means that only one fossil had the carbonized impressions extending from parts of its forelimbs at some distance from the bones, leaving plenty of leeway to speculate about what they were, or whether they had any connection to the animal.  Yet their artwork shows the adult with fully-fledged wing feathers, barbs, barbules and all, and even multiple colors!Even the language they use to describe the “feathers” is couched with escape hatches.  “Their distribution and orientation are similar to the insertion pattern of covert feathers (20, 21), which form the bulk of the feather covering in modern bird wings,” they said.  “The shapes of the individual markings are consistent with the morphology of the rigid shafts of such feathers.”  The authors continually described their fossils as “primitive” as opposed to to “modern” birds.There’s no way this specimen can have anything to do with the origin of avian flight.  The authors did not even try to connect it to flight.  Feathers on this bulky dinosaur don’t help the arboreal or cursorial hypothesis.  It’s a stretch to connect it to courtship, either; the authors didn’t say if it was a male or female.  Any dinosaur so outfitted with feathers as the artwork suggests would seem to be seriously hampered from eating between courtship displays.  The authors used the power of suggestion to state, “Several roles have been proposed for primitive wings [gliding (23, 24), predatory behaviors (25, 26), or terrestrial locomotion (27, 28)], but their occurrence in a clade of ground-dwelling herbivorous (29) non-maniraptorans [the group that used to lump theropods with birds] suggests that they did not originate for predatory behaviors or aerial locomotion.” Reference 27 points to Ken Dial’s “wing assisted incline running” speculation he dreamed up by watching chukar partridge chicks (5/01/2006, 12/22/2003).  Since chukars are 100% birds, this amounts to a kind of recapitulation theory.Despite these problems, Science Now promoted the Zelenitsky paper with this overblown concoction of dogma, suggestion and composite explanation:Dinosaurs still walk—and fly—among us: We call them birds. Most paleontologists think birds descended from a group of winged dinosaurs, and thus dinos never went completely extinct. But where did the wings come from? New discoveries from Canada suggest that both wings and feathers arose earlier in dinosaur evolution than previously thought, possibly to attract members of the opposite sex or to protect hatching baby dinos.The headline was, “Dinosaurs Sprouted Wings Earlier Than Previously Thought,” even though the original paper only referred to the presence of a “pennibrachium,” defined as “a forelimb bearing long feathers that form a planar, wing-like surface but are not necessarily used in aerial locomotion.”   This definition is theory-laden since it was defined in reference to “feathered dinosaurs” (Royal Society).  Zelenitsky et al. referred to it as a “wing-like structure” but it’s basically a wrist adaptation that allows the arms of a dinosaur to fold, whether or not it was feathered.  Humans can fold their arms, too.Whatever the markings mean, therefore, they complicate the story of dinosaur-to-bird evolution.  One final observation: the specimens are found in upper Cretaceous, meaning that true birds were already flying around when it lived.  And an encore: the adult specimen exhibits the “dinosaur death pose” that indicates suffocation in water (2/16/2012, 11/23/2011).Original paper: Zelenitsky et al., “Feathered Non-Avian Dinosaurs from North America Provide Insight into Wing Origins,” Science 26 October 2012: Vol. 338 no. 6106 pp. 510-514, DOI: 10.1126/science.1225376.This shameful display of suggestive reporting in a leading scientific journal, promoted uncritically by the media, reveals the sad state of science these days.Ornithomimus was so named because of its resemblance to an ostrich.  Ostriches have feathery wings used for display and balance.  If this “dinosaur” had some kind of “filamentous feathers” (granting extremely generous license to speculation), so be it.  But evolutionists are going to need a lot better evidence than this.  More likely, the emotional mad dash to establish connections between dinosaurs and birds gives some researchers a Gold Rush mentality to strive for fame and fortune by stretching the truth.  Journal editors and science reporters are only to happy to oblige them, since another “feathered dinosaur” makes for good headlines, particularly when accompanied by wickedly overdrawn artwork (suggestion, extrapolation, visualization).Experienced readers will withhold acceptance of such wild claims, knowing full well a re-interpretation is likely, if not a retraction, after less Darwin-inebriated scientists take a look at the specimens.  Critics like Alan Feduccia and the Oregon State squad will doubtless have something to say (AIG).last_img read more

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U2U corn nitrogen management tool updated

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Purdue University-based Useful to Usable climate initiative is taking some of the guesswork out of crop nitrogen management for more farmers by expanding its Corn Split N tool to include all Corn Belt states.The free tool helps farmers and advisers manage the application of in-field nitrogen to maximize crop yields and minimize environmental damage. Efficient nitrogen management is critical for earning a profit in present economic conditions, said Ray Massey, Extension professor of agricultural and applied economics at the University of Missouri, a partner in the initiative known as U2U.“Studies indicate that Split N applications to corn can improve profitability as well as increase risk,” Massey said. “The Corn Split N tool helps farmers understand and manage the risk of Split N applications.”Corn Split N integrates historical data on weather and fieldwork conditions with economic considerations to determine the feasibility and profitability of completing a post-planting nitrogen application for corn production.“U2U has combined corn yield response data from Extension crop fertility specialists together with statistical modeling of days suitable for fieldwork to expand the Split N tool to cover seven new states,” said Ben Gramig, associate professor of agricultural and resource economics at Purdue.Farmers in Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Missouri, Kansas, Wisconsin, Minnesota, South Dakota, North Dakota, Nebraska, Ohio and Michigan can get customized results based on their planting and fertilization schedule, local costs and available equipment.The tool also has a summarized fieldwork table and crop calendar so farmers can see how schedule adjustments might affect their ability to fertilize on time. Accumulations of growing degree days, or GDDs, and associated corn growth beyond the current day are estimates based on the historical 30-year average GDD accumulation for a user-selected location.Corn Split N is part of the U2U suite of online tools that help farmers and agricultural advisers manage increasingly variable weather and climate conditions across the Corn Belt. U2U provides historical climate data that helps purchasing, marketing and activity planning throughout the growing cycle.To access the expanded Corn Split N tool, go to www.AgClimate4u.org.Useful to Usable is a research and Extension project, funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, composed of 50 faculty, staff and students from nine U.S. universities with expertise in applied climatology, crop modeling, agronomy, cyber technology, agricultural economics and other social sciences.last_img read more

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Solar Hot Water

first_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in This article is only available to GBA Prime Members If you’re aiming to reduce your carbon footprint, you’ve probably thought about installing a solar hot water system. Here’s the good news: if you have an unshaded south-facing roof, you can install a solar hot water system that will meet about half your annual hot water needs.The bad news: the typical solar hot water system costs between $6,000 and $10,000.ICS, Drainback, or Antifreeze?There are three main types of solar hot water systems (also known as solar thermal systems):Integrated collector-storage (ICS) systems, also known as “batch” systems, store hot water in a roof-mounted tank above the collector. Such systems are common in Israel, Hawaii, and other warm climates where freeze damage is unlikely.Those of us who live in frosty climates need a freeze-resistant system. To protect against freeze damage, a solar hot water system either drains all the fluid from the collector when it’s cold — the drainback approach — or circulates an antifreeze solution through the collectors.The collectors in a drainback system are usually dry. When temperature sensors indicate that the sun is shining, a control activates a pump which circulates water through the collector pipes. Later, when the control senses that the sun has gone away, all of the water in the collectors is automatically drained to a “drainback tank” — a special tank, separate from the home’s hot-water storage tank, that holds the collector water. The next day, when the sun comes out again, the water from the drainback tank is again circulated through the collectors. Whenever the pump is operating, hot water from the collectors circulates through a heat exchanger to raise the temperature of the water in the main storage tank.Propylene Glycol AntifreezeThe second way to make a solar hot water system freeze-resistant is to use an antifreeze… center_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.last_img read more

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A Pretty Good House in the Sierra Nevada

first_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Members Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. Though he landed his first job in architecture while still in high school, architect Jeff Adams’s path to designing high-performance homes wasn’t a straight line.When his father encouraged him to get a summer job as a teenager, Jeff sent resumes to a dozen architecture firms. One of them, Line and Space, a modern architecture firm in Tucson, AZ, run by an acquaintance of his father, offered Jeff a job. At first the work was maintenance on rental properties, but eventually Jeff learned to trace sketches for presentations and to building architectural models.After high school, Jeff studied civil engineering at Princeton, though he did his thesis on architecture and earned an architecture certificate. He then went back to work for Line and Space. They we building a 25,000 square foot home. “It was sort of over-the-top,” said Jeff, “but it also was kind of fun. I worked on site, drawing a lot of details in the field. It was an immersion into modern detailing.”Soon, Jeff returned to school for a master’s degree in architecture, this time at UCLA. He stayed in southern California where he was a project architect at Johnston Marklee and worked on the acclaimed Hill House. But Jeff eventually had enough of the big city. When a friend recruited him to work on a communal property in northern California, he jumped on the opportunity. The move turned out to be the start of an eight-year sabbatical from conventional architecture.After falling in love, getting married, and having a child, Jeff realized that he had “unfinished business with architecture.” He dusted off his textbooks and studied for the state exams. He passed. He finally had a license to practice architecture. Through a mutual friend, Jeff was introduced to Mela Breen, the founder and principal… center_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log inlast_img read more

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INLD march to dig SYL canal today

first_imgAhead of the Indian National Lok Dal’s (INLD) plan of marching towards Punjab on February 23 in an attempt to dig the controversial Sutlej-Yamuna Link (SYL) canal, Haryana Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar on Wednesday said that the issue should not be politicised.“An all-party delegation led by him had called on the President of India on this issue and he had given a patient hearing. Supreme Court has already repealed the Punjab Termination of Agreements Act-2004 passed by the Punjab Vidhan Sabha and now the matter was pending with the apex court for implementation,” said Mr. Khattar.He said that though the SYL issue was sub-judice, Haryana should get its due share of water. “I’m hopeful that the State would get its rightful share,” he said.“I urge to the people and other political parties not to take law in their own hands. Even though this issue is related to Punjab government yet I believe that peace would prevail in the State,” he said, adding the law and order situation in Haryana would be maintained.INLD leader Abhay Chautala has announced that party worker would march towards Punjab after gathering in Ambala’s grain market – to dig SYL canal in an attempt to get its share of water.Barricades erectedIn the wake of INLD’s proposed march security arrangements have been beefed by both Haryana and Punjab police at the border villages of the two States in a bid to keep law and order situation under check. Barricades have been erected at Shambhu barrier on NH1 on Punjab and Haryana border and to prevent individuals from assembling in the area, section 144 has been implemented.While Punjab has deployed 10 companies of paramilitary forces and around 5,000 policemen in villages adjoining Haryana border. Haryana on other hand has deployed five companies of paramilitary forces, besides heavy deployment of police.Even the Supreme Court on Wednesday asked the Centre to maintain surveillance in view of the proposed march by INLD workers.Punjab and Haryana are set for a face-off on the issue of sharing water from the SYL canal after political parties from both the States have taken a stiff stance on water sharing.While Punjab Chief Minister Parkash Singh Badal has been reiterating that Punjab does not have extra water to spare for any other State and not a single drop can be allowed to flow through SYL, the Punjab Congress president Capt. Amarinder Singh had demanded preventive arrest of INLD leader Abhay Chautala and alleged that it was evident that the Haryana government was not serious about nipping the situation that could arise out the proposed march.PTI adds:The Haryana Congress on Wednesday hit out at the INLD, accusing it of doing politics over the water-sharing issue.Speaking to scribes here, State Congress chief Ashok Tanwar dubbed the INLD’s announcement as “a political stunt” and said the party had earlier failed to support various accords which were in Haryana’s favour.Fight for survival“What INLD is doing is just a political stunt. The party is on its last legs and fighting for its survival. Now, suddenly it has dawned upon them that they have to safeguard Haryana’s interests on water issue,” said Mr. Tanwar. “INLD opposed Rajiv-Longowal and other accords which were in Haryana’s favour. Everyone knows that the Chautalas and the ruling Badal family in Punjab share close family ties. Both the Akalis and the INLD have been shadow-boxing on the water issue to fool the people,” he said.The State Congress chief alleged the INLD of using the SYL issue “like a political football for its vested interests”.“In Haryana, everyone knows they are playing second fiddle to the BJP and now no one is going to believe in the stunts they are trying to indulge in,” Mr Tanwar said.last_img read more

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